Popular Science

Hunters may need to keep their paws off Wisconsin wolves

Poaching may be a bigger threat than the state thought
gray wolf

A gray wolf

Wisconsin's wolves are a great success story in many ways. When the state began monitoring its gray wolf population in 1979, there were only about 25 left in the area, after bounty hunting and prey decline nearly wiped them out. Today, thanks to the Endangered Species Act and the state's efforts, Wisconsin is home to about 800 gray wolves. But they may not be out of hot water yet.

In 2012, Wisconsin declared its wolves were no longer endangered, and over the course of three years, hunters obtained permits to kill more than 500 of them. A federal judge put the population back

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