Bloomberg Businessweek

“HOLLYWOOD”

Studios were set for a jump in China’s quota on U.S. films this year. Then came President Trump | “There is a disconnect between what Trump…might want to do and what Hollywood wants”

Anousha Sakoui, with Jeanne Yang

During a visit to Los Angeles five years ago this month, China’s Xi Jinping gave Hollywood a much needed shot in the arm. The incoming Chinese leader agreed to ease an almost 20-year-old quota on American films, nearly doubling both the number of U.S. movies imported to China and Hollywood studios’ share of the box-office receipts—a deal that temporarily settled a World Trade Organization case the U.S. brought against China.

There was an understanding that in 2017 the two nations would return to the table to increase the compensation to U.S. moviemakers and for China to open its market further. But

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