Inc.

Surviving Your Customer Breakup

It’s easy to let yourself rely on big, lucrative clients. But what happens if they ditch you?

Helaine Olen

WHEN KRISTI FAULKNER co-founded marketing firm Womenkind, she soon landed a well-known global bank as a client. Over the next seven years, Faulkner’s New York City business worked with the financial services giant on female-friendly marketing, and strategy. It eventually became Faulkner’s biggest customer, accounting for 50 percent of Womenkind’s revenue in 2014.

And then one day, it all came

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