Fortune

MEET THE WORKPLACE CULTURE WARRIORS

EMPLOYEES ALREADY LOVE THEM, BUT THESE BEST COMPANIES ARE STILL RETHINKING HOW THEY DO BUSINESS, HOW THEY HIRE, AND EVEN THEIR CORE VALUES. HERE’S HOW W.L. GORE, WORKDAY, AND SAP AMERICA ARE SHAKING UP THEIR OFFICES AND STAYING AHEAD OF THE PACK.
A Ping-Pong tournament at Workday’s Pleasanton, Calif., headquarters last year.

IF YOU ASK Terri Kelly what she does to make W.L. Gore such a great place to work, she’ll say she has it pretty easy: “This is something our founders thought through almost 60 years ago.” Since Kelly took the helm in 2005, Gore has made Fortune’s list of Best Companies to Work For every year—but to be fair, it had already been on every year since we started the ranking in 1998 (see our

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