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Remains Discovered On Lifted Ferry Are Not Human, South Korean Officials Say

Officials believed they found the bones of one of the missing victims of the Sewol's 2014 sinking, which killed 304 people. But hours later, officials clarified that those bones belong to "an animal."
A close-up photograph of the remains of the Sewol, as seen during a salvage operation off the coast of South Korea's southern island of Jindo on Friday. Source: Ed Jones

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Just hours after South Korean officials announced they had found human bones and possessions in the corroded wreck of the Sewol, those same officials withdrew the claim Tuesday.

What appeared to be the "bones of a dead person on the deck

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