The Atlantic

North Korea’s Parade and Le Pen’s Foreign Policy: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing

The highlights from seven days of reading about the world
Source: Robert Pratta / Reuters

A Prayer’s Chance
Brian Goldstone | Harper’s
“When Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s founding prime minister, assumed office in 1957, he had ambitious plans for his country. A number of his grandiose designs for an ‘industrialized socialist society’ came to fruition, but most did not. Among the discarded projects was the Pan-African Mental Health Village, a cutting-edge experiment in a kind of therapeutic collectivism. Outfitted with a cinema, a supermarket, and a surgical theater, the village was conceived as a tranquil place where the mentally ill

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