Newsweek

How Smart Devices Like Your Fitbit Can Solve Crimes

The best crime-solving detective in the world might be sitting in your living room right now.
A Fitbit fitness tracker. Police in Connecticut used a murdered woman's device to trace her last movements and use the information to charge her husband as the killer
FitBit Surge sports watch

A couple of decades ago, DNA tests were the frontier in solving crimes. But the array of devices we’re putting in our homes and on our bodies are quickly becoming a detective’s new best friend—at least while we still have detectives. Before long, artificial intelligence should be able to analyze the data pouring in from devices and nail criminals better than any human gumshoe. Time to develop a new TV show: CSI: Robots.

Two recent, well-publicized cases have given us a glimpse of this future. One involved Amazon’s Echo device, which is driven by the company’s artificial intelligence software, Alexa. An Echo can sit in a home and listen for verbal

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Newsweek

Newsweek4 min readSociety
Journalist's Fearless Investigation of Mexico Massacre
Journalist Anabel Hernández has been investigating collusion between government officials and drug cartels, as well as the illicit drug trade and abuse of power, for Mexico’s biggest publications for more than two decades.
Newsweek7 min readPolitics
How a Social Media Post in Russia Can Land You in Jail
It was just before 6 a.m. when police officers raided Daniil Markin’s apartment in Barnaul, a small Russian city some 2,000 miles from Moscow. Markin, a film student who was 18 at the time of the July 2017 raid, had no idea why police had burst into
Newsweek3 min readSociety
Jill Soloway Reflects on 'Transparent' in New Memoir
In "She Wants It," Soloway tells the story of the hit Amazon show—from the beginning to its messy end.