Popular Science

Climate change might literally keep us up at night

Americans will lose quality sleep as temperatures rise.
sleeping

No rest for the wicked.

Pixabay

During October, 2015, it was abnormally hot in San Diego. Daytime temperatures soared into the high 90s, and evenings were only modestly cooler. Night after night, the heat kept Nick Obradovich awake. His friends and colleagues were having the same experience, sleepless at night, lethargic and grumpy during the day. “Clearly the heat was taking a toll,” he said. “It was just too hot to sleep.”

After several nights of tossing and turning, Obradovich — who studies how people interact with climate — decided

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