The Atlantic

It's Disadvantaged Groups That Suffer Most When Free Speech Is Curtailed on Campus

If progressives are committed to protecting freedom of conscience and freedom of expression for women and minorities, then they need to protect free speech across the board.
Source: Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

Harvard President Drew Faust gave a ringing endorsement of free speech in her recent commencement address. There was, however, one passage where Faust asserted that the price of Harvard’s commitment to free speech “is paid disproportionately by” those students who don’t fit the traditional profile of being “white, male, Protestant, and upper class.” That point has been illustrated by a few recent controversies over speakers whose words were deemed offensive by some members of those non-traditional groups of students. But focusing solely on those controversies, and on a

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