Popular Science

Finding a sense of purpose probably won't fix your sleep problems

Don't believe every study you see on Google News.
Girl awkwardly in bed

It's easy!

Dieter Robbins/Pixabay

If you're having trouble falling asleep, maybe you can rest easy knowing that if you just had a sense of purpose in life, you’d already be dreaming. But probably not. In all likelihood, that anxiety-inducing thought is actually going to make it harder for you to get enough sleep. That's not stopping some neurologists from recommending “purpose” as a solution to your insomnia.

That may sound ridiculous to you. Good! You’re appropriately skeptical. You may have recently seen some far-fetched headlines about drifting into dreamland more quickly once

Вы читаете отрывок, зарегистрируйтесь, чтобы читать полное издание.

Другое от: Popular Science

Popular Science10 мин. чтения
Kandy-kolored, Streamlined, And Definitely Around The Bend
It was the first Saturday of December 2018—tournament day—and he thought the cars he’d built could outperform anyone’s. They were compact. Sleek. Speedy. He watched anxiously as his pinewood derby racers took their spots at the top of a long, sloping
Popular Science1 мин. чтения
What Fun Things Did We Learn Making This Issue?
PopSci’s team of fact-checkers makes sure that the big stories we print jibe with the evidence. In the process they often dig up some knowledge nuggets that normally wouldn’t make it to press. Here are their favorites. “Surfing’s Big Break,” page 60
Popular Science2 мин. чтения
Anatomy Of A Laugh
THE OLDEST KNOWN JOKE DATES BACK NEARLY 4,000 years, and it’s a fart gag. The fact that we’ve been crackin’ wise for so long suggests there’s something innate about the need to laugh. Heck—chimps, rats, and perhaps even dolphins do it. Neuroscientist