Popular Science

Drones will fly into the path of the eclipse to study weather

As the sky goes dark, robots will conduct atmospheric science.
A hex drone and a DJI Phantom fly in the sunset

A hex drone and a DJI Phantom fly in the sunset

On Monday, hex drones will fly into the sky during the eclipse to measure the change in weather from the sudden darkness and the sudden cold.

Jamey Jacob

When the sun disappears behind the moon on Monday, scientists will be ready. The astrophysics of the eclipse in the strange beauty of day gone suddenly dark. For the atmospheric scientist however, the eclipse provides a shining opportunity to directly study how the sun influences weather patterns by heating the atmosphere. To that end, a team of researchers from Oklahoma State University and the University of Nebraska is going to spend Monday tracking changes in the atmosphere in the path of the eclipse. And to get just how the eclipse changes the weather in the low sky, the team will fly drones during the totality.

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