NPR

'Here, We Are United': A Puerto Rico Church Offers Comfort After Hurricane Maria

A church in Utuado, in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region, is open for a community reeling from the effects of Maria — including deaths from landslides, lack of electricity and blocked roads.
Ada Reyes holds the hand of her daughter Adamaris Rodriguez. Source: Carol Guzy

Every Sunday since Hurricane Maria ripped through Puerto Rico, Ada Reyes and her four children have walked half an hour to church. Down a winding road, dodging fallen trees and debris, they walk past cement houses still bearing flood marks, and finally cross the Vivi — a small river in Utuado, a city in the central mountain

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