Futurity

Police bodycam test results don’t meet expectations

"They have a new piece of technology placed on the solar plexus. You would expect that the monitoring alone would change their behavior."

Police departments have embraced body-worn cameras as a tool for reducing police misconduct and building trust between law-enforcement officers and the communities they serve, but do they work?

A randomized-controlled trial conducted within the Washington, DC Metropolitan Police Department by The Lab @ DC, involving about 2,200 officers, shows they don’t notably change officer behavior.

Alexander Coppock, a Yale University political science professor and coauthor of the study, talks about the findings and what they say about the abilities of body cameras to prevent abuse:

The post Police bodycam test results don’t meet expectations appeared first on Futurity.

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