The New York Times

Nuclear War Doesn't Seem So Funny After All

In January, I started writing a novel in which a 10-kiloton nuclear bomb was detonated in the center of Washington, where I live. It was meant to be funny. I had read a 2011 report by the Federal Emergency Management Agency that described the effect of such a detonation and was surprised to learn that my apartment in Adams Morgan would most likely survive the initial blast.

I imagined myself and my neighbors — about half wealthy millennials and half older people who’d bought in before the

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