NPR

How The Loss Of U.S. Psychiatric Hospitals Led To A Mental Health Crisis

The evaporation of long-term psychiatric facilities in the U.S. has escalated over the past decade, sparked by a trend toward deinstitutionalization of mental health patients in the 1950s and '60s.

A severe shortage of inpatient care for people with mental illness is amounting to a public health crisis, as the number of individuals struggling with a range of psychiatric problems continues to rise.

The revelation that the gunman in the Sutherland Springs, Texas, church shooting escaped from a psychiatric hospital in 2012 is renewing concerns about the state of mental health care in this country. A study published in the journal 3.4 percent of

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR8 min read
John Williams And Anne-Sophie Mutter, 2 Geniuses For The Price Of One
John Williams is an honored film composer, but he began as an arranger. Williams is now arranging again, this time with the acclaimed violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter on the album Across the Stars.
NPR2 min readPsychology
Shhhhh. Listen Closely. Your Plants Might Be Talking
With extremely sensitive microphones, a new exhibit at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden shows it's possible to hear the sounds that plants make when they're growing.
NPR3 min read
'The Downstairs Girl' Faces Difficult History With Joy And Style
In Stacey Lee's new novel, an opinionated and talented Chinese American girl makes her way in Reconstruction-era Atlanta while preserving her secret work as an advice columnist in the local paper.