NPR

Buried In Trump's Nuclear Report: A Russian Doomsday Weapon

The administration's Nuclear Posture Review mentions a massive, nuclear-armed torpedo capable of incinerating cities. But is it real?
On March 1, 1954, the U.S. conducted its largest nuclear test with a yield of 15 megatons. The new Russian weapon would be up to 100 megatons, according to reports. Source: USAF Lookout Moutain Laboratory

Today, the Trump administration released a report on the state of America's nuclear weaponry. The assessment, known as a Nuclear Posture Review, mainly concerns U.S. nukes and missiles.

But buried in the plan is a mention of a mysterious Russian weapon called "Status-6." On paper, at least, Status-6 appears to be a kind of doomsday device. The report refers to it as "a new intercontinental, nuclear-armed, nuclear-powered, undersea autonomous torpedo."

"The radius of total or near-total destruction is the size of. "It's difficult to imagine in normal terms."

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