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Charleston, Key Port For Slaves In America, Apologizes And Meditates On Racism Today

The plight of migrant families at the U.S. southern border was also mentioned, amid discussions of exploiting laborers and treating people of a different race as chattel in the slave era.

Charleston, S.C., has formally denounced slavery and apologized for the port city's role in that evil institution. The City Council voted 7-5 to condemn the industry that had long thrived in Charleston — the entry point for nearly half the slaves who were brought from Africa to the U.S.

A capacity crowd gathered to comment and to witness the council's vote Tuesday, which followed a number of speeches on slavery and its role in building Charleston and adding to American prosperity.

If anyone at the council meeting wanted to

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