The Atlantic

A Game-Changing AI Tool for Tracking Animal Movements

Scientists are already using it to study octopuses, electric fish, surgical robots, and racehorses.
Source: Mackenzie Mathis

In a video, a rodent reaches out and grabs a morsel of food, while small, colored dots highlight the positions of its knuckles. In another clip, a racehorse gallops along a track; again, small, colored dots track the position of its body parts. In a third video, two human dancers circle around each other as those same dots unfailingly follow the sometimes fluid, sometimes jerky movements of their limbs.

These videos are showcases for , a tool that can automatically track and label the body parts of moving animals. Developed this year by and , a pair of married

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