NPR

Record Number Of Native Americans Running For Office In Midterms

Deb Haaland could be the first Native American woman to head to Congress. She's one of a record number of Native American candidates running for office this year.

On a recent afternoon in Albuquerque, N.M., Deb Haaland sits with a thick stack of paper in front of her, calling donors to thank them for their contributions and to ask them for more money.

After winning her Democratic primary, Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna, a Native American tribe, is running for the U.S. House in a strongly Democratic district in New Mexico. That means she may soon be the first Native American woman in Congress.

"Somebody has to be the first," she says as she walks through the southeast neighborhood where her office is. "Native women, I mean we've been on the frontlines for a long, long time. Think of all the native women who

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