Bloomberg Businessweek

Hollywood Looks for a Bigger Role in China

U.S. studios expected greater access to the mainland in 2018. Then the trade war erupted

This was supposed to be a big year for Hollywood in China. The five-year World Trade Organization film pact the U.S. and Beijing signed in 2012 was set to be renegotiated, holding out the promise that American studio productions would gain greater access to the world’s second-largest movie market. The industry had expected to see an increase in the number of U.S. films allowed, more access to key viewing windows such as summer, when China’s film authorities rarely allow foreign movies, and a higher share of box-office receipts.

Now it’s looking like Hollywood’s long-awaited payday in China could become collateral damage in the trade war brought on by President Trump’s tariffs. Not only have negotiations about widening access to the

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