Inc.

The Illusion of Agreement

Your teams assume they’re talking about the same thing—until they realize they’re not.

How many times has this happened to you? You have a conversation with people on your team about building something. You arrive at an agreement about that vision. Then they go off to build that thing. A few weeks later, they come back to unveil what you agreed on—except it looks absolutely nothing like you had discussed.

Your first impulse might be to think they weren’t

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