NPR

Poll: Most Americans Know About Opioid Antidote And Are Willing To Use It

While a majority of Americans know about naloxone, there is confusion about the fact that in most places a prescription isn't required to obtain the emergency overdose treatment.
A man holds a sample of the opioid antidote Narcan during a training session at a New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene office in March. Source: Kena Betancur

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams made a plea in April for more Americans to be prepared to administer naloxone, an opioid antidote, in case they or people close to them suffer an overdose.

"The call to action is to recognize if you're at risk," Adams . "And if you or a loved one are at risk, keep within reach, know how to use naloxone."

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