Futurity

1 year after Charlottesville, law prof gauges US racism

One year after white supremacists marched in Charlottesville, Virginia, law professor Rick Banks discusses racism and what's driving it.

When Barack Obama became the first African-American president in 2008, many saw it as a milestone that racism in the United States was on the wane. But what is really happening?

Statistics highlighting pay disparity, an extreme jump in the incarceration rates, the number of police shootings, and maternity ward deaths, tell a different story, says Rick Banks, professor of law at Stanford University.

One year after white supremacist marchers clashed with protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, Banks discusses racism and some of the social and economic drivers for the movement.

The post 1 year after Charlottesville, law prof gauges US racism appeared first on Futurity.

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