Popular Science

ASMR videos are just beginning to whisper their anti-anxiety secrets to scientists

The calming sensation these videos induce might help Internet users calm down.
girl listening to headphones

More than a feeling?

Shutterstock

You may know “ASMR” as the niche genre of YouTube video which people watch on tablets and laptops to help them relax, perhaps before bed or in the lull of a Sunday afternoon. These videos typically involve someone role-playing a mundane professional service, such as giving you a haircut, a massage, or booking you in for a doctors’ appointment.

The role-plays are usually performed in whispered voices, with the “ASMRtist” (the term for the creators of these videos) focused on building

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