NPR

San Francisco Removes Statue Of Native Man At Feet Of Colonizers

The statue, called Early Days, showed a Native American gazing up at a vaquero, or Spanish cowboy, and a proselytizing priest. Native groups have long called for the sculpture's removal.
An empty pedestal remains where a statue known as Early Days, which depicted a Native American at the feet of a Catholic missionary and Spanish cowboy, used to stand on Fulton Street in San Francisco. The statue was removed early Friday morning. Source: Justin Sullivan

In the pre-dawn darkness on Friday morning, work crews removed a controversial statue from San Francisco's Civic Center Plaza, after the city's arts commission unanimously voted to take down the "racist and disrespectful sculpture."

The statue depicts "the degradation and genocide of Native American peoples" using stereotypes that "are now universally viewed in February.

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