Bloomberg Businessweek

Casinos

Uncertainty over Macau’s gaming licenses will stall near-term investment
City of Dreams Manila casino in the Philippines

Since Macau opened its doors to Las Vegas operators 16 years ago, annual revenue at the Chinese territory’s casinos has surged tenfold, to $33 billion, making it the world’s largest gaming locale. But the luck of casino operators in the former Portuguese colony—the only place where gambling is legal in China—may be running out.

The profits are still climbing and are forecast to hit a record next year, but the rate of growth is expected to slow in 2019

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