The New York Times

How to Accept a Compliment -- Even if It's From Yourself

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

ACKNOWLEDGING SMALL WINS, EVEN IF THEY BARELY CHIP AWAY AT OUR LARGER GOALS, CAN STILL BOOST OUR MOOD AND MOTIVATION.

Pumping yourself up after a big win can feel a little awkward. You want to acknowledge good work, but you don’t want to feel arrogant. It’s that tricky balance of quietly reveling in a job well done without coming off as … well, a jerk.

Despite that awkwardness, getting credit for your work gives your brain good feelings and helps you accomplish more. Companies use praise to try to boost productivity and even revenue, and experts say that the psychological impact of keeping a positive view of your accomplishments can decrease stress and encourage better habits.

Unfortunately, not all praise is rewarded equally. Studies show that in the workplace, women, and especially women of color, are often given less

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