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Transcript: NPR's Interview National Security Adviser John Bolton

NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to National Security Adviser John Bolton about natural security threats posed by China and the arrest of Meng Wanzhou, scion of a Chinese telecommunications giant.
National Security Adviser John Bolton speaks during a White House news briefing in October. Source: Alex Wong/Getty Images

In an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep, National Security Adviser John Bolton talks about the arrest of Meng Wanzhou, scion of a Chinese telecommunications giant, natural security threats posed by China and a second summit with North Korea.

Steve Inskeep: We'll just dive right in. But I want to start with the arrest that we learned about last night and that I presume you've known about for some time. What is the message that is sent by the arrest of Meng Wanzhou?

National Security Adviser John Bolton: Well, I'd rather not get into the specifics of law enforcement matters but, but we've had enormous concern for years about ... in this country about the practice of Chinese firms to use stolen American intellectual property to engage in forced technology transfers and to be used really as arms of the Chinese government's objectives in terms of information technology in particular. So not respecting this particular arrest, but Huawei is one company we've been concerned about, there are others as well. I think this is going be a major subject of the negotiations that President Trump and President Xi Jinping agreed on in

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