The Atlantic

Man in the Empty Suit and the Sad Side of Time Travel

Sean Ferrell’s second novel addresses what it means to really look at yourself, literally.
Source: Soho Press

, by Sean Ferrell, follows a world-weary time traveler who celebrates every birthday by visiting the same spot in the far future. Once a year he gathers with scores of selves at an abandoned New York City hotel, each self from a different year of his life—some older and inscrutable, some younger and insufferable. The story begins when the central character, now in his 39th year, arrives at the party and stumbles upon an inexplicably murdered self from six months in the future.

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