NPR

What The Future Of Work Means For Cities

One of the nation's top economists explores the past and future of work in cities. He finds that opportunities for workers without a college degree are drying up.
George Jetson at work Source: The Jetsons via YouTube

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Two weeks ago, MIT's David Autor gave the prestigious Richard T. Ely lecture at the annual meeting of American economists in Atlanta. Introduced by the former chair of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke as a "first-class thinker" who was doing "path-breaking" work on the central economic issues of , , and , Autor strolled up to the microphone with a big smile. was about the past and future of work, and he focused

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