NPR

Killings Of Guatemala's Indigenous Activists Raise Specter Of Human Rights Crisis

Indigenous groups and human rights activists worry that the violence that raged through their communities in the 1970s and 1980s is making a comeback.
Storekeepers from La Terminal market march in support of Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales in Guatemala City this month. Source: Orlando Estrada

For three days last week, thousands of Guatemalans blocked roads and major highways to protest the Central American country's slide toward a constitutional crisis. The protest organizers included groups that have long demanded justice: indigenous communities and campesinos, as rural and farm workers are called.

Indigenous citizens, many dressed in colorful traditional clothing, came out partly to protest the Guatemalan president's recent expulsion of a United Nations-backed commission investigating corruption in the country. Since 2007, the International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala, known by its Spanish initials CICIG and

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR6 min readPolitics
A Guide To What's Happening In Hong Kong
For months, Hong Kong has been at a boiling point, teeming with protesters and police officers. Here's an overview of what's been going on and why.
NPR2 min readFood & Wine
Take Advantage Of Corn Season With 3 Unique Recipes
It’s corn season, and Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst celebrates with recipes for a corn and potato curry, a corn, tomato, and basil tart, and corn and chicken tacos. Many cooks have tricks for the best way to remove the kernels from a cob of co
NPR2 min readPolitics
Julián Castro Is 10th Democrat To Qualify For September Presidential Debate
The former HUD secretary made the cut just over a week before the deadline to hit polling and fundraising benchmarks. Less than half the field is likely to make it on stage in Houston next month.