NPR

Learning What's Sacred In Screwball 'Holy Lands'

Very little actually is sacred — at least to begin with — in Amanda Sthers' lively new novel about a Jewish pig farmer in Israel, his fractious family, and their voluminous correspondence.
Source: Amr Alfiky

Pithy, loaded letters and emails aimed at their vulnerable targets fly more like missiles than missives in Amanda Sthers' lively epistolary novel about a combative, estranged family scattered between Israel, France, New York, and Los Angeles. At the beginning of Holy Lands, it seems as if nothing is sacrosanct to this pugnacious foursome. During the course of this short novel, that changes.

Sthers is a prolific French novelist, playwright, and screenwriter. her tenth novel, which she has

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR2 min readPolitics
Canada's Trudeau Approves Controversial Pipeline Expansion
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau first approved the project, which is opposed by many environmental groups, in 2016, but Tuesday's announcement means construction can begin later this year.
NPR2 min read
'Starving' Polar Bear Wanders Into Siberian Town
Residents in the town of Norilsk in northern Siberia were surprised to see the female bear, who reportedly appeared to be exhausted and looking for food.
NPR4 min read
Joy Harjo Becomes The First Native American U.S. Poet Laureate
A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, the 68-year-old poet and musician says she bears "the honor on behalf of the people and my ancestors" and aims to serve as an "ambassador" of the art form.