The Guardian

DNA from 200-year-old pipe sheds light on life of enslaved African woman

US archaeologists trace roots of woman to modern-day Sierra Leone as part of ongoing ancestry research
‘As soon as people stepped on those slave ships in Africa ... that identity was lost,’ said the study’s chief archeologist. Pictured: The ‘Raise Up’ statute at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, Alabama. Photograph: Brynn Anderson/AP

Archaeologists used DNA taken from a broken clay pipe stem found in Maryland to build a picture of an enslaved woman who died around 200 years ago and had origins in modern-day Sierra Leone. One researcher called the work “a mind-blower”.

“In this particular context,.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Guardian

The Guardian3 min read
This Solstice, Try Stonehenge As Therapy | Maggie Aderin-Pocock
The prehistoric peoples who built this amazing monument could teach us a lesson about connecting with the universe
The Guardian5 min read
The New Drug Highway: Pacific Islands At Centre Of Cocaine Trafficking Boom
Explosion in number of boats carrying cocaine and meth from Latin America to Australia is causing havoc for islands on the way
The Guardian5 min read
Holocaust Historians Divided Over Warsaw Ghetto Museum
Director hits back at critics who say the institution, backed by Poland’s populist party, will distort wartime history