NPR

Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds

Some 11 million deaths annually are linked to diet-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease, a study finds. Researchers say that makes diet the leading risk factor for deaths around the world.
Poor diet is the leading risk factor for deaths from lifestyle-related diseases in the majority of the world, according to new research. Source: John D. Buffington

About 11 million deaths a year are linked to poor diets around the globe.

And what's driving this? As a planet we don't eat enough healthy foods including whole grains, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables. At the same time, we consume too many sugary drinks, too much salt and too much processed meat.

As part of a researchers analyzed the diets of people in 195 countries using survey data, as well as sales data and household expenditure data. Then they related to other risk factors, such as smoking and drug use, at the global level.)

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