NPR

'A Woman Of No Importance' Finally Gets Her Due

Virginia Hall was an American spy who worked for Britain and the U.S. and played a key role in undermining the Nazi occupation of France during World War II. Her story was rarely told — until now.

Virginia Hall is one of the most important American spies most people have never heard of.

Her story is on display at the CIA Museum inside the spy agency headquarters in Langley, Va. — but this is off-limits to the public.

"She was the most highly decorated female civilian during World War II," said
Janelle Neises, the museum's deputy director, who's providing a tour.

So why haven't more people heard about Hall? A quote from Hall on the agency display offers an explanation: "Many of my friends were killed for talking too much."

But now — more than 70 years after her wartime exploits in France, and almost 40 years after her death — Virginia Hall is having a moment. Three books have just come out. Two movies are in the works.

Вы читаете отрывок, зарегистрируйтесь, чтобы читать полное издание.

Другое от: NPR

NPR3 мин. чтения
Hank Aaron, Baseball's Legendary Slugger, Dies At 86
"Hammerin' Hank" was 86. He shattered Babe Ruth's home run record in 1974, defying the poverty and racism that threatened to diminish him.
NPR4 мин. чтения
Luis Trelles And Andrew Mambo Join NPR's Enterprise Storytelling Unit
Nicole Beemsterboer, Supervising Senior Producer of the Enterprise Storytelling Unit, announced the new hires who started this week.
NPR2 мин. чтенияCrime & Violence
U.S. Military Moves To Try 3 Guantanamo Suspects Linked To Indonesia Bombings
The men have been held in U.S. custody since 2003, accused of planning and helping to carry out the deadly bombing attacks at a Bali nightclub in 2002 and at a J.W. Marriott Hotel in Jakarta.