NPR

World's First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

It took more than 30 years to develop. The hope is it will eventually save tens of thousands of lives each year. But there are a few issues.
Source: Sean McMinn

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Today health officials are making history. They're rolling out the first approved vaccine aimed at stopping a human parasite. It's for malaria — and the hopes are that one day the vaccine could save the lives of tens of thousands of children each year.

"This [rollout] is, who directs the Global Malaria Programme at the World Health Organization.

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