NPR

Does Taking Time For Compassion Make Doctors Better At Their Jobs?

In their new book Compassionomics, two doctors review the field of compassion research. Their finding? When physicians take time to connect and express care, both patients and doctors benefit.
Studies show that when doctors practice compassion, patients fare better, and doctors experience less burnout. Source: Cavan Images

For most of his career, Dr. Stephen Trzeciak was not a big believer in the "touchy-feely" side of medicine. As a specialist in intensive care and chief of medicine at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, N.J., Trzeciak felt most at home in the hard sciences.

Then his new boss, , came to him with a problem: Recent studies had shown an epidemic of burnout among health care providers. As co-president of Cooper, Mazzarelli was in charge of a major medical system and needed to find

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