Inc.

How Should You Feel After the Deal?

Most startups aren’t going public. So what happens after you get bought?

If they’re being honest, most entrepreneurs would say that selling their company was always the plan. Sure, we talk about building a billion-dollar, publicly traded, long-lived enterprise. That’s the dream. But if we’re pairing our positivity with our pragmatism, the more likely exit strategy involves some larger company finding that the product or service we created is essential to its grander plans. M&A beats IPO any day.

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