The New York Times

Becoming a Digital Grandparent

WHEN IT COMES TO WARNINGS ABOUT LIMITING KIDS’ SCREEN TIME, GRANDPARENTS ARE, WELL, GRANDFATHERED IN.

Emerging from a theater on a recent Sunday, I turned on my phone and found a flurry of texts from my daughter. My 2-year-old granddaughter had just smashed her thumb in a closing restaurant door.

Wincing, I read on:

They were headed for an urgent care clinic.

They were waiting for X-rays.

The thumb was broken and needed a splint.

My granddaughter, who lives in Brooklyn, FaceTimes with her other grandparents out West almost every Sunday, a way to help bridge the distance. I live only about an hour away and serve as her day care provider every Thursday, so I haven’t felt the same

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