Popular Science

Female vampire bats regurgitate bloody dinners for their starving girlfriends

Female vampire bats develop and maintain social bonds resembling friendships—by sharing blood meals.
Female vampire bats develop and maintain social bonds resembling friendships—by sharing blood meals. (Sherri and Brock Fenton/)

Nothing screams spooky season quite like vampire bats. The leathery wings, snarling snouts, and of course, the blood-exclusive diet, all make these one-of-a-kind mammals into real-life monsters. However, in reality these seemingly terrifying creatures are actually quite friendly—at least with one another.

A study published on Halloween in found that vampire bats develop and

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