Black Belt Magazine

Leo Fong’s Winding Road to Wei Kuen Do

WHEN LEO RETURNED HOME, his father asked how his first day had gone. “Great!” the boy replied. “Everybody likes me. They even sang to me.”

His father asked, “What did they sing?”

Leo said, “Ching-chong Chinaman.”

His face red with anger, his father said, “They don’t like you. Don’t you know they are making fun of your racial heritage?”

The next day at recess, a teacher organized a softball game and told Leo to play first base. One kid hit the ball and ran to first. He looked at Leo and said, “Chink!” Without hesitation, Leo punched him in the nose, knocking him to the ground.

The teacher grabbed Leo,

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