Baseball Digest

THE GAME I’LL NEVER FORGET

In New York lore, let alone that of Major League Baseball, Daniel Murphy may never replace the Yankees’ Reggie Jackson as “Mr. October.” But in the fall of 2015, he definitely rewrote Murphy’s Law. Virtually anything that could go right did for the then-30-year-old Mets second baseman. Murphy homered in six consecutive postseason games, breaking the record of five set by the Houston Astros’ Carlos Beltrán in 2004.

Murphy surpassed Beltrán on October 21, 2015, at Wrigley Field.

His eighth-inning homer off veteran reliever Fernando Rodney highlighted an 8-3 victory over the Chicago Cubs that put the Mets into the World Series for the first time since 2000. Indeed, New York led Game 4 of the National League Championship Series by a 6-1 score when Murphy delivered the exclamation point on a Mets sweep. With teammate David Wright on base, Murphy launched a 1-1 pitch from Rodney into the right-center-field seats.

Entering that game, I think I was aware I had tied the record. But you never think you’re going to break it. You never think you’re going to hit a home run in six straight games in the postseason. If anybody tells you that … I can tell you I didn’t think I was going to.

And who

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