Capper's Farmer

Embrace Broody Hens

MANY chicken keepers get frustrated when a hen persistently sits on her eggs, but I embrace her “broodiness,” because it makes my job much easier. Why spend the time, trouble, and money buying fertilized eggs, babying them in an incubator, and hand-raising chicks when I can let one of my hens do all the work for me?

When I first became interested in getting chicks the old-fashioned way, I was surprised to find that helpful advice could be hard to come by. Perhaps this is because farmers have culled broody hens for centuries. After all, broody hens don’t lay eggs, and that costs farmers money. Because of this culling practice, modern hens aren’t well wired to hatch eggs.

In general, consider heritage breeds if you’re selecting for broodiness. Heritage breeds have a greater tendency to go broody, because they haven’t had the trait bred out of them to the same degree as modern hybrids. Still, you’re not guaranteed a broody hen from a heritage breed, or a non-setter (a hen that won’t go broody)

Вы читаете отрывок, зарегистрируйтесь, чтобы читать полное издание.

Другое от: Capper's Farmer

Capper's Farmer6 мин. чтения
Threshing Day
IT was July 1938. Dad and I hitched Maud and Pearl, our team of matched Belgian mares, to the grain binder, and pulled it out of the storage shed. The humped-back machine needed some repairs. The canvas conveyor belts needed slats riveted, both on th
Capper's Farmer1 мин. чтения
Capper's Farmer
Editor-in-Chief TRACI SMITH Group Editor, Rural Lifestyles REBECCA MARTIN Group Editor, Wellness & Natural Living JEAN DENNEY Group Editor, Collectibles LANDON HALL Senior Managing Editor CAITLIN WILSON Managing Editor CARLA TILGHMAN Senior Copy Edit
Capper's Farmer2 мин. чтения
Rural Free Delivery
Cheryl Wipperman Marshall, Minnesota I enjoyed reading Rebecca Martin's "Scent of the Cellar" (Editor's Note) in the Fall 2019 issue of Capper's Farmer, and it inspired me to share the memory of my favorite scent. Lilacs bring back wonderful memori