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Sarah's Key

Sarah's Key

Написано Tatiana de Rosnay

Озвучено Polly Stone


Sarah's Key

Написано Tatiana de Rosnay

Озвучено Polly Stone

оценки:
4/5 (411 оценки)
Длина:
9 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Dec 12, 2008
ISBN:
9781427207562
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel' d'Hiv' roundup, but not before she locks her younger brother in a cupboard in the family's apartment, thinking that she will be back within a few hours.

Paris, May 2002: On Vel' d'Hiv's 60th anniversary, journalist Julia Jarmond is asked to write an article about this black day in France's past. Through her contemporary investigation, she stumbles onto a trail of long-hidden family secrets that connect her to Sarah. Julia finds herself compelled to retrace the girl's ordeal, from that terrible term in the Vel d'Hiv', to the camps, and beyond. As she probes into Sarah's past, she begins to question her own place in France, and to reevaluate her marriage and her life.

Tatiana de Rosnay offers us a brilliantly subtle, compelling portrait of France under occupation and reveals the taboos and silence that surround this painful episode.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Издатель:
Издано:
Dec 12, 2008
ISBN:
9781427207562
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Tatiana de Rosnay is the author of eleven novels, including the New York Times bestselling novel Sarah’s Key, an international bestselling sensation with over two million copies sold in thirty-five countries worldwide. Together with Dan Brown, Stephenie Meyer, and Stieg Larsson, she was named one of the top ten fiction writers in Europe in 2009. Tatiana lives with her husband and two children in Paris. Visit her online at www.tatianaderosnay.com

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4.0
411 оценки / 396 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorite stories of all time. The gripping story of a family’s struggle during the war. The heartbreak of loss and the hopes for a new life. I recommend this book all the time!
  • (4/5)
    The first time I heard about this story I saw the movie a few years ago. I didn't put two and two together that the movie was made from the book. I think this book is a must read for everyone. There are so many different sides to what happened during World War II and this is yet another side. Every time I read a story about what happened to the Jews it just tears a little bit of my heart away. This story is about Julia an American journalist living in Paris who stumbles upon the story of Sarah Starzynski and what happened to her family during the Vel' d'Hiv' roundup on July 16, 1942. I remember this being a very powerful movie and it is a very powerful book. If you want to learn more about World War II and what happened during that time in France, pick up this book, you won't be disappointed and it will haunt you for a very long time.
  • (5/5)
    Two stories are told told in short, alternating chapters. The first takes place during the two-day Vel' d' Hiv', a Nazi-directed roundup of Jews by French police, surely one of the most shameful moments in French history. Over 13,000 Jews, including 4000 children, were arrested in July, 1942, and kept for days with little food or water and no sanitation, about 7500 of them in an enclosed stadium, before first the men, then the women, were taken to Auschwitz. The children, children of all ages, were kept for some days more and then transported to Auschwitz for immediate gassing. One child's story is told, that of Sarah, a 10-year old girl whose 4-year old brother locks himself in their apartment's hidden closet when the police break in. Sarah takes the key with her and promises to return for him. The second story is of a modern-day American journalist, long settled in Paris, who discovers her in-laws' apartment was taken over by her husband's family only weeks after the arrests. She becomes obsessed with finding out who the family was and if anyone survived. Her discoveries result in dreadful memories unburied and family histories revealed, and they change the lives around her forever.I had several strong reactions to this story. First, the descriptions of the stadium, of the agony of the families being separated and the children being torn from their parents with no explanation or any promise of resolution, was heartbreaking and immediate because of what's been going on at the southern border in the U.S. The details bring alive the monstrous situation certain of our political leaders seem to think is business as usual and with which they are little concerned. No, hopefully the kids our government have arrested will not be executed, but spiritually and mentally the damage is horrifying and likely to come back to haunt us. I hesitate to compare our current leaders with the Nazis (wannabes, maybe), but in this instance the similarity is pretty clear.The other thing that bothered me was the author's descriptions of the French character. If she is correct, it's rather shocking to American sensibilities. If not, it's quite a gross exaggeration. If someone who has read the book and knows France ever comments on this I'd be very interested. The book sort of winds down too long before the final page, but the first three-quarters make for a stunning page-turner.
  • (4/5)
    This is a moving and compelling book about a dark period in French history when, in July 1942, over 10 000 French Jews were rounded up and kept inhumanly in Paris' Valodrome d'Hiver before being sent to their deaths at Auschwitz.

    The story is told through the eyes of two females. One being ten-year-old Sarah who, along with her parents, are arrested and sent to the Valodrome, and middle-aged Julia Jarmond, an American writer living in Paris, who has been asked to write an article on the events of 1942 as the 60th anniversary of Vel'd'Hiv approaches.

    Most of the book alternates between the lives of Sarah and Julia, and I was disappointed when Sarah's story stopped as I found hers to be far more powerful when compared to the modern, personal problems that Julia faces in her daily life. Throughout the story long-kept secrets are gradually revealed as the reader discovers not only how the lives of Sarah and Julia are intertwined, but how the events of 1942 changed two families forever.

    My one regret is that I didn't read this book before seeing the movie. As usual the book is so much better, but unfortunately, thanks to the movie, I knew what was going to happen throughout the story so it lost some of its impact for me. However, still a great read.
  • (4/5)
    This novel kept me riveted right from the start. I had never heard of the horrible event in Paris during the war, around which the story is structured. I enjoyed the two voices, one in the past and the other in the present, telling their own stories in alternating chapters. I was disappointed when that ended about ¾ of the way through. I would have preferred to have heard Sarah’s own narrative continue. Some of the action seemed to be a little contrived and I sometimes felt as if the same points just kept getting hammered at me, but maybe that was the point. All in all, though, this was a fascinating, well-told story that will stay with me for some time.
  • (5/5)
    good story. her personal life story less interesting.
  • (5/5)
    This may well be the best novel I've ever read.

    I had seen the movie in the theatre when it was first released, and had loved it.

    When I finally got around to reading the book, I was amazed at the eauthor's ease with words. She writes the way I drink. And I drank in her words effortlessly. And as with a good drink on a hot and sunny day, she left me wanting more...
  • (5/5)
    Really fantastic. Sadly I don't have much time to explain why and how I loved it, but it was remarkably lovely despite dealing with a depressing subject matter, and on top of that, the historical facts underpinning the story were all new to me, which was fascinating and terrible and sad.
  • (5/5)
    Incredibly sad, incredibly beautiful
  • (4/5)
    Mom got this from the Large-Print section at the library- I don't know if I flew through this book due to it being large-print or due to not wanting to have to NOT know how it ended overnight.

    So sad and tragic and truthful all wrapped in on binding.

    I knew, logically, the if France was occupied during WWII, that the Nazis were in charge and that the Jews must have been "dealt with" there, too, but the human cost in lives and ethics delineated here makes it hard to breathe.

    I mean, we crammed too many people into the Dome here in NOLA during Katrina- people were hungry and thirsty and overheated and just this side of ready to riot, but nobody was keeping them in with guns, for god's sake. And when we bused them out at the end, it wasn't to death camps, it was to safety and some semblence of civilization...

    And tucking away the truth because it is inconvenient and upsetting never works out in the end.
  • (4/5)
    What a sad story..but so important. I had no idea the French government betrayed their Jewish citizens by rounding them up and delivering them to the concentration camps. This is the story of one young girl caught up in that atrocity and the impact on her life and that of the journalist assigned to write a story about Vel' d'Hiv' roundup.

  • (5/5)
    Let me say first off, this book though fictional is based on real true life events that happened in France July 16, 1942. I had no knowledge of this even what so ever. I even googled it because I was astonished at the fact that I had never heard or been taught about this world history class in high school. Maybe it was over shadowed by Germany and didn't have as much news on the incident. However, I do believe the mass murder of over 13,00 people and over 4,000 of those being children is something that I should have know about.

    This book was beautifully written and I devoured it in a mere two days. It had me feeling sad and sickened about what happened to these children. It may be because I'm a mom or maybe because I'm a sensitive type of person. A great read that I would recommend to anyone. The characters were all well written though I despise Bertrand.
  • (4/5)
    This was another great book regarding the Holocaust. Very very sad for sure, but a wonderful read.
  • (4/5)
    This is a beautifully written book. The chapters detailing the "roundup" were so said. While necessary to the story, I am glad these chapters were broken up with scenes from current times. I enjoyed reading about how Julia solved the mystery and the impact it had on her life. This was an educational and enjoyable read though I was a little disappointed in the ending.
  • (4/5)
    This was a fantastic read. A book written in two parts - present day and during the Holocaust. As a mum the thought of this happening is heart-stopping.Back Cover Blurb:Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten-year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel' d'Hiv' roundup, but not before she locks her younger brother in a cupboard in the family's apartment, thinking that she will be back within a few hours.Paris, May 2002: On Vel d'Hiv's 60th anniversary, journalist Julia Jarmond is asked to write an article about this black day in France's past. Through her contemporary investigation, she stumbles onto a trail of long-hidden family secrets that connect her to Sarah. Julia finds herself compelled to retrace the girl's ordeal, from that terrible time in the Vel 'Hiv', to the camps, and beyond. As she probes into Sarah's past, she begins to question her own place in France, and to reevaluate her marriage and her life.
  • (5/5)
    Multiple people told me what a great book this was and I just hadn't gotten around to reading it. It's been a long time since I've sat down and read as non-stop as I did with this one. With 3 kids in the house it's rare that I have such an opportunity, but I truly could not put down Sarah's Key. What an amazingly wonderful story!
  • (4/5)
    A beautiful and poignant story.
  • (3/5)
    The basic story was good, but I felt the modern part was at times illogic and too long.
  • (3/5)
    A powerful piece dealing with an oft-neglected area of the Holocaust.
  • (4/5)
    An outstanding fictional account of the horrid activities of the French police in collusion with the Nazi in the early days of World War II. Jewish children were rounded up and housed in the Vel' d'Hiv temporarily on the way to Auschwitz. This story flips between 1942 and present time when a journalist was assigned an article on the 60th anniversary of the Vel' d'Hiv.The author gets into the mind of Sarah, a ten year old Jewish girl who escaped from the Vel' d'Hiv in an attempt to get back to her apartment and rescue her young brother. This part of the story grips you and stays with you.The other part of the story is Julia's attempt to understand what these children went through and the secrets that her French in-laws were hiding. This part of the book didn't grip me as much as Sarah's story and in parts it seemed to drag a bit. But it all came together in the last page and brought Sarah's story full circle.I highly recommend this book even if you aren't interested in World War ii or the Holocaust. It is a wonderful story on its own.
  • (5/5)
    This book gave details that I had never heard of about the Holocaust and after further research of my own found these facts to be true. I had no idea people now lived in Drancy Internment Camp outside of Paris where they held and tortured Jews. Just mind baffling. But this book follows two stories that intertwine. One from 1941 and one in current time. This book reads flawlessly. And it absolutes pulls you into another world as you read. I had a hard time putting it down.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book!
  • (4/5)
    Heartbreaking work.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book. Read it in two days.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderfully written!
  • (4/5)
    Great book.
  • (4/5)
    I have just a few pages left of Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay and I have to say that I really enjoyed it, even more than I thought I would. The first part is told in alternating chapters from the points of view of Sarah Starzynski, a 10 year old girl as her family is being rounded up in July 1942 to be sent to Auschwitz by the French police and Julia Jarmond a modern day reporter, who discovers her story. It is written, especially Sarah's portion, in a short choppy style that I at first found annoying, but then decided it worked really well because it describes how a ten year old might actually tell the story. I received a free copy from the publisher as part of their Reading Group Gold program and would highly recommend it.
  • (3/5)
    Right down the middle on this one, one that i WANTED to love. I loved the little girl Sarah from France in WW2.......could not take the journalist of present-day times named Julia. This book would have been much better had the author stuck with one era/story and leaving it at that.....preferably the earlier times.One part i loved and cried, knowing what was coming and not wanting to know at the same time. When the Nazis come for Sarahs family she hides her little brother away and locks him in their special hiding place. They won't be gone long right? Things will get straightened out. right? And she leaves the home gripping the key in her hand....holds the safety of her little brother in her hand.I just wish to all that is holy that the author stuck with Sarah and improved upon THAT part of the story. Zachor. Al Tichkah
  • (5/5)
    A stunning work.
  • (4/5)
    Painfully beautiful...