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The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Написано Isabel Wilkerson

Озвучено Robin Miles


The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Написано Isabel Wilkerson

Озвучено Robin Miles

оценки:
5/5 (309 оценки)
Длина:
22 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781455814251
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Примечание редактора

Sweeping and riveting…

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson brings to life the previously overlooked story of the Great Migration, when millions of African Americans uprooted their lives to move from the South to cities across the US from 1915 to 1970. Sweeping and riveting, Wilkerson’s book made the ZORA Canon, a list of 100 of the greatest books written by African American women.

Описание

In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to previously untapped data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

With stunning detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois state senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue medicine, becoming the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful career that allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.

Wilkerson brilliantly captures her subjects' first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed their new cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable work, a superb account of an "unrecognized immigration" within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.
Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781455814251
Формат:
Аудиокнига


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  • Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson brings to life the previously overlooked story of the Great Migration, when millions of African Americans uprooted their lives to move from the South to cities in the North, the Midwest, and out West from 1915 to 1970. By tracing the journeys of three people, Wilkerson makes the sweeping history accessible and riveting. Barack Obama included "The Warmth of Other Suns" on his 2019 reading list for Black History Month.

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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    This was a very interesting story of three black migrants from the South, to Los Angeles, Chicago and New York City. It is rich with the details of their lives. Personally, I was shocked to to learn about the discrimination migrants faced in the North and West, especially the housing discrimination. Of course, I was well aware of this before reading the book, but the personal experiences brought the facts home for me. > "When it was time to go, they paid their tab and put their glasses down. The bartender had said very little to them the whole time they were there. Now the bartender calmly picked up their glasses, and instead of loading them into a tray to be washed, he took them and smashed them under the counter. … “They do it right in front of us,” George said. “That’s the way they let us know they didn’t want us in there. As fast as you drink out of a glass and set it down, they break it.” There were no colored or white signs in New York. That was the unnerving and tricky part of making your way through a place that looked free.One of the characters is mostly unsympathetic, both at the time and in his later recollections. He's shallow, greedy, self-important—and, despite the author's spirited defense, sounds like an awful doctor. This complicates the story, though, in an interesting way. A niggle is that occasionally (at least six times) little descriptions are repeated, almost word for word, hundreds of pages apart. Why did the editing miss this? But really, quite a few pages could have been cut in editing without harming the book. A bigger problem is that beyond the personal stories, Wilkerson is very weak at telling and explaining the history. At least the minimum is there, so that's good—we get some of the broader context along with all the anecdotes. Still, there is not much, and what there is is weak. For example, at one point Wilkerson argues that the Great Migration forced change in the South. One can certainly make this case based on the information in this book. But her evidence when she makes the argument? The number of lynchings declined over the decades of the migration. I think she should have dug into this question more deeply.
  • (4/5)
    This as a very interesting book for someone like me. Someone whose knowledge of recent American history is limited to the Civil Rights movement of the 1960's (courtesy of a High School History module), and whatever I can reliably take from TV and films. Which would be not much. It ties the general phenomenon of the 20th C migration of blacks from the South to North /West US together with the specific life stories of three such migrants.I had no idea how hard it was for people to leave the South: that it was an escape, not just a move. In towns where the local law ran it how they wanted, people literally snuck out in the middle of the night lest they be "caught" attempting to board a train. I had a vague idea that the North and South were different, but this book really showed me how. Racism was all over the country, but in the South it was backed up by the very real threat of a gruesome death. That this occurred in such recent times still makes my chest feel tight in sadness and disbelief.The community and social support people had in the South may have been partly an act of necessity in the face of such terrible hardship and fear, but it was sorely missed by those families who fled. They arrived to very different ways in Northern cities, and had to adjust. But- they had their freedom. As time marched on, the Northern migrants saw changes in their home states, but with new lives most stayed where they were. And these patterns of movement changed American cities for ever.There was a lot of information in this book. And a lot of repetition. I feel there could have been a good 100-120 pages removed and it wouldn't have altered the story. The short sections that detailed the personal stories were hopped between fairly quickly, but were then backed up by some historical and social facts. It is a great method of telling a non fiction narrative. But too bitsy for me, and a case of there being a little too much information. A very worthwhile read.
  • (5/5)
    I had been meaning to read this book ever since it came out, but the national uprising against police brutality following the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson pushed me to finally pick it up. I felt it was necessary to improve my understanding of the history of structural racism in the US.Isabel Wilkerson's book covers several decades and a huge geography but she keeps her discussion focused on the experience of her three protagonists who left the South because of their particular experiences under Jim Crow and the conditions they faced in the north (or, in the case of Robert Foster, California).Wilkerson writes in the book's introduction about what might be "the biggest underreported story of the twentieth century":"Over the course of six decades, some six million black southerners left the land of their forefathers and fanned out across the country for an uncertain existence in nearly every other corner of America. The Great Migration would become a turing point in history. It would transform urban America and recast the social and political order of every city it touched."Wilkerson's book is a significant effort in understanding the leaderless Great Migration's meaning and its legacy. Though she focuses on three main characters throughout, Wilkerson interviewed 1,200 people for the book and she also cites a variety of secondary sources. So while the book is narrative-driven, it is grounded in comprehensive research.Some have criticized the book for repeating details but it seemed obvious that this was done so that chapters can work as stand-alone pieces, making this book a good resource for teachers. So I don't think this should be held against the book; it would be a shame if it hadn't been approached with classroom education in mind.I do think this book is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand why racial inequality is so entrenched in the United States today. I plan to follow it up with Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow and Angela Davis' Are Prisons Obsolete?
  • (5/5)
    Fabulous and touching
  • (5/5)
    Deeply moving history of the post-World War I mass migration of African Americans from the deep South to northern and western cities where they expected to find better lives. The author focuses on three individuals and their families. While they escaped the brutal violence and legally-mandated segregation they had grown up with, they found themselves in a new world that was less than idyllic.
  • (5/5)
    May be the most powerful book I read this year.
  • (5/5)
    Isabel Wilkerson, herself a child of parents who left the South for a better life up North, said she wrote this book "because of what I saw as incomplete perceptions, outside of scholarly circles, of what the Great Migration was and how and why it happened, particularly through the eyes of those who experienced it." Knowing this will in no way prepare the reader for the scope of research and time it must have taken to produce this book. I knew that black people had moved north to escape the abuses they were subject to in the south. I had no idea how many and for how long (roughly WWI - 1970). Wilkerson chose three main people to highlight, and moves between each of their stories to illustrate different decades of migration and different experiences. She talks about them as immigrants within their own country because of the commonalities between their experiences and those of immigrants from other countries. I almost see it as a new wave of pioneers. That's just semantics, I suppose, but it does solve one issue Wilkerson cited - that many of the people she interviewed did not want to be seen as immigrants. They are American. This is their country. This is not an easy book to read. The sheer weight of the injustice and abuse that led to the relocation of millions of people is overwhelming. It was, if nothing else, an affirmation of the power of an individual decision, however powerless the individual might appear on the surface. "In the simple process of walking away one by one, " wrote the scholar Lawrence R. Rodgers, "millions of African-American southerners have altered the course of their own, and all of America's history." Over the decades, perhaps the wrong questions have been asked about the Great Migration. Perhaps it is not a question of whether the migrants brought good or ill to the cities they fled to or were pushed or pulled to their destinations, but a question of how they summoned the courage to leave in the first place or how they found the will to press beyond the forces against them and the faith in a country that had rejected them for so long. By their actions, they did not dream the American dream, they willed it into being by a definition of their own choosing. They did not ask to be accepted but declared themselves the Americans that perhaps few other recognized but that they had always been deep within their hearts.
  • (5/5)
    A magnificent work, rich in both historical and sociological data and personal histories of being Black in the South. Six million African-Americans left the South for Northern and Western cities to escape a totalitarian apartheid. The day-to-day evil of whites toward blacks in the Southern states is intensely disturbing; it rises to the level of a type of Holocaust.. Information is conveyed about who the migrants were, their aspirations and their achievements. Northern racism is also illuminated. The book humanizes what had previously been a hidden phenomenon known to the black community but not to other Americans. Unforgettable and profound.
  • (4/5)
    This is an depth study of the causes, impact and motivations for "The Great Migration" of African Americans out of the South into the North of the US between 1915-1970. The author follows the migration and lives after migration of 3 individuals covering 3 different decades and 3 cities and uses this to compare and contrast. The over arching themes of the book include supporting the understanding that migrants from the South were better educated, harder working and more stable than most sociologists would admit and that there is a compelling argument that these people were more like immigrants than migrants. It also offers an insightful look at individual and personal happiness based on how the individuals handled the cultural change from a personal perspective. This makes the book much more than just a social study, much more interesting because of the life lessons that are provided regarding how people adjust or don't. The all more telling side of human nature that human beings are unwilling to admit mistakes, unwilling to face realities and unable in the end to deny who they really are comes out in full force. I found the book much more interesting on the level of the personal behavior and how these people dealt with change than on the overall sociological level that was the authors stated purpose. This is a book I will undoubtedly re-visit, there is a great deal to it. I can easily recommend it.
  • (5/5)
    Amazingly researched and written history of the African-American/black migration from the south to the cities of the north, midwest, and west. Wilkerson is a Pulitzer-winning journalist, and journalists doing history usually drives me crazy. But she knows her stuff, can research, and can write--and her journalism background is undoubtedly useful for doing good oral history.Wilkerson follows 3 black adults who left the south for somewhat different reasons (to escape to safety after his activism was well known, to achieve his dreams of being a top doctor, and to escape a life of sharecropping), in different decades, from different places, and for different destinations. The three did not know each other and came from fairly different backgrounds (educated but trapped in menial work, well educated, and sharecroppers)--but all lived under Jim Crow and had dreams for themselves and their children.This book should be required reading for all Americans. It is moving, depressing, hopeful, and more--all at the same time. And it explains a lot of things Americans see every day--from segregated neighborhoods to crowded southern restaurants.
  • (5/5)
    I feel enlightened about so many things after reading this. the story - which i knew nothing about - of this great migration informs me about the struggle for lgbt etc. rights, the struggle for women's rights, and finally schooled me about what white privilege means. a deeply important book, necessary in these times.
  • (5/5)
    The only reason I did not give this book 5 stars is that it is a bit repetitive and far more information than I need or can retain. But it is well written and well researched and tells a part of the history of this country that is unfamiliar to many people. By telling the story of 3 different people who left the south in three different decades, Wilkerson is able to convey the change that was trying to come to the south over the years and also how most attitudes and situations would not change until forced to by either economics or the governement. It is a long read but well worth the time and effort.
  • (4/5)
    In the mid-twentieth century, many Southern blacks began to see opportunity in other parts of the country, particularly urban cities such as Milwaukee, Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles. The author takes the stories of three such migrants and weaves them in such a manner as to show the similarities of their experiences even though their experiences were quite different. There's the story of Ida Mae, a black woman from Chickasaw County, Mississippi, who ended up in Chicago where she worked as a nurse's aide while her husband worked in a factory rather than picking cotton as they had done. There's the story of George, a black man from Lake County, Florida, who went from picking oranges to attending passenger train cars. There's also the story of Dr. Robert Foster who went from Louisiana to Los Angeles where he practiced medicine and attended patients such as Ray Charles while becoming increasingly addicted to gambling. I perhaps understood Ida Mae's journey most because of my familiarity with her point of origin as it was the county adjacent to the one in which I grew up. The author has done a superb job weaving the stories together to show a unified theme. I did, however, feel that the story was a bit long and perhaps a little redundant in places. The author has done a great job researching and presenting a story that needed to be told.
  • (5/5)
    I picked this up at random because it looked interesting and I had some book money saved up. I ended up using part of it in my English 1101 class. My students really enjoyed the section I gave them and really seemed to engage with the style of the writing (we used it during our description/narration unit). The writing is accessible and highly engaging. The stories themselves are terrible in their simplicity, brutality and beauty. I thought I would just peruse the book and then come back to it later, but I read one entire section in one sitting because I became so wrapped up in one of the stories. I would recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in American history, but also for anyone who has an interest in human history--in the human cost of racism discrimination, no matter what your skin color or ethnic heritage. This is a wonderfully written and researched book.
  • (4/5)
    If you like history that is. If not, it might be more of a three star read for you. This is about the migration of african americans from the post civil war South. It expounds on the trials and tribulations of those trying to escape the Jim Crow laws and the prejudices. This was surprisingly interesting and insightful. I didn't think I was that interested in this part of American history but Isabel Wilkerson kept me rivited.
  • (4/5)
    This book was interesting. I didn't know that there was a huge migration of black people from the south to the north. I am insensed that their rights were so compromised. The three stories were interesting but I think the statistics part of the story could have been told in an epilog at the end of the book.
  • (5/5)
    Here's a history book for people who don't like non-fiction: the story of the "Great Migration" -- the huge movement of America's black population from the South to the North and West between 1915 and 1975. It follows the lives of three individuals, but includes cameo appearances of others who illustrate different aspects the author wants to highlight. I was most struck by the difficulty of a journey that doesn't seem as it should be difficult -- 24 hours on a train or bus is all it takes to move from the Deep South to one of the great industrial cities. I had the idea it was a trivial journey. I know think differently. My one quibble with the book is that the author spends too much energy defending against the charge that it was this migration that destroyed the cities - creating a black culture of unemployment, unwed mothers, drug abuse, welfare by inserting a large number of rural black people into them. It would have been sufficient to quote her statistics showing otherwise once, not several times through the book. She oversimplifies the argument to make her point.
  • (4/5)
    [The Warmth of Other Suns] presents the migration of blacks from the south between WWI and 1970 from the historical record but mostly by presenting the story of three representative migrant. The personal slant brought the story more clearly into focus. The book, however did seem to be plagued by too much repetition of points.
  • (5/5)
    The author uses the narrative stories of three different people during 3 slightly different decades to depict the migration of American blacks from the Jim Crow south to the north and west. In doing so she makes our history of segregation and racial discrimination personal.The book is well done, though somewhat repetitious in that she tries to give us a close up view of the 3 person's narratives, then attempts to step back and give the broader lens of that experience.There has been so much fiction written on this topic (The Help and Mudbound are two recent ones from my library), but this piece of nonfiction does what no fiction could ever do. It tells the story of real lives and real experiences that are the shame of our country. This one ranks right up there with The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, in telling a story that should cause us all to pause and reflect on our past and resolve to make a better future..
  • (4/5)
    This is an excellent exploration of the migration of African-Americans from the South to the North and West during the middle third of the 20th century. Through the life stories of three people who moved from Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi to New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago, Wilkerson tells the story of Jim Crow and of the transformation the Great Migration brought to individual lives, families, and the country as a whole. I learned a lot and came to care about the lives of these three brave and determined individuals. Their lives weren't perfect; the north and west were not as welcoming, generous, or kind as Ida Mae, George, and Robert had hoped. But their stories are the stories of our country. Well-written, fastidiously researched, only occasionally redundant in detail or argument, this is a first-class piece of scholarly narrative.
  • (5/5)
    Possibly the most lyrically writtern non-fiction book I've ever read. The book resonates with me as a southerner who can remember the dying gasp of Jim Crow as well as for the fact that the community where I now live is home to many who have returned home from the great migration.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. In-depth look at the Great Migration of southern black American families to the north and west. Follows migration of Ida Mae Gladney from Mississippi in 1937 to Chicago, George Starling from Florida in 1945 to Harlem, and Robert Foster from Louisiana in 1953 to Los Angeles. Extremely well researched. Paints a powerful picture of these experiences as part of 20th century American history.
  • (5/5)
    This is a wonderful book. I have recommended it to all my family members. It is the story of my parents who grew up in Tennessee and migrated north to Detroit. The story of our neighbors who too migrated from Alabama and Louisiana. This is the story my parent never told me. The pain, the real reasons for the move and the pain that awaited at the end of the journey. Why the riots happened, why did they come specifically to Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland? What did they leave behind? The myths, the realities and the lies all bound up to together in this book, paint a clear picture. It is lengthy, detailed, inspiring and heart-breaking. I loved being a part of this journey as I know that I and my siblings am a part of the result.If you have any interest in the African-American journey in America, READ THIS BOOK!!
  • (5/5)
    This book is wonderfully, beautifully written. In my opinion it should at least have been nominated for and probably won the National Book Award in 2010. Perhaps it will win the 2011 Pulitzer. I went to bed reading it and I got up in the morning and read it and I thought about it all day long. I recommend it highly.
  • (5/5)
    This book has been receiving well-deserved rave reviews and been on several lists of best books of the year. It is a marvelous work of scholarship, yet well-written enough to appeal to the lay reader.The book tells the story of the great migration of blacks from the American South to the North and West. It lasted from around World War I up to the seventies, when conditions for blacks in the South began to get better. The migration was partly in hopes of better economic opportunities, but primarily to escape the harsh rule of Jim Crow with its strict segregation and a caste system maintained through violence.Part of the book gives the facts and statistics about the South and about the migration. At its core, however, is the tale of three people, told in alternating chapters. One is George Starling, who left Florida after death threats when he tried on a small scale to organize labor to ask for better wages. He went to New York an became a baggage handler on the railroads, never able to use his brain and some college education to get a better job.Second was Ida Mae Gladney, who married young and lived as a sharecropper in Mississippi. She and her husband moved to Chicago.Third was Robert Pershing Foster from Monroe, Louisiana, a doctor who married the daughter of the President of Atlanta University, who moved to Los Angeles where he hoped to be able to achieve more as a doctor than he could under the limitations on black doctors in the South.Wilkerson does a masterful job of weaving the strands together, combining oral history with material from primary documents. It is not a book for white Southerners seeking to prove the South under Jim Crow was not that bad - Wilkerson shows in detail how bad it was. She manages to tell the individual stories so that each chapter tells of parallel experiences, even though each story is unique. It is a long book but holds the interest of the reader throughout. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    I am the grandchild and great-grandchild of white immigrants to America who came from southern and eastern Europe. This is not my story. But it is a story of moving from one homeland to another seeking a better life for oneself and one's children, and of how the "old country" is never truly left behind - and in that respect, it has elements in common with an immigrant story. However, the people Isabel Wilkerson writes about in The Warmth of Other Suns probably wouldn't call themselves immigrants; they moved from one part of their own country to another in hopes of more fully experiencing the rights and privileges of American citizenship.When we talk about the mid-20th-century civil-rights movement, we're usually thinking of the struggles to end legal segregation in the American South. But Wilkerson's book demonstrates the ways that black people who left the South and its Jim Crow system for city life in the North and West changed that system from the outside - not by political means, but by the very fact of making lives away from it. It also illustrates that racist systems are more than capable of developing on their own, via cultural forces rather than force of law.The subtitle of this book, "The Epic Story of America's Great Migration," is entirely accurate, but Wilkerson scales it to an approachable level by conveying it through the experiences of three individual migrants. Ida Mae Gladney, with her husband and children, made a stealthy departure from the Mississippi cotton fields during the heart of the Great Depression, first to Milwaukee and then to Chicago, where many Mississippi migrants had landed already. Uneducated sharecroppers willing to work hard, the Gladneys both eventually found long-term blue-collar jobs and established their family on Chicago's South Side. George Starling came from the citrus groves of central Florida, and was thwarted in his efforts to complete a college education by his own father and a culture that didn't see its value. But he learned enough to try to organize and get better pay for his fellow grove workers, and knew enough to slip out of state when his efforts became dangerous. George made it to New York in 1945, finding a home in Harlem and work on the railroad, attending to passengers on the north-south routes between New York and Florida and effectively living between both his worlds. Robert Pershing Foster grew up as the youngest son of two teachers in Monroe, Louisiana and always envisioned something more - college, medical school, a well-established family and career of his own, and life without the restrictions of Jim Crow. In 1953, he set out to find it in the Promised Land - Los Angeles - but never quite left behind everything he thought he did.The stories of these three individuals are more than effective vehicles for illustrating the Great Migration via anecdote - they are riveting reading in their own right. I found the chapters leading up to and including each of their departures from the South particularly engrossing and suspenseful. However, the real achievement of the book is in making the context of these stories - the socio-economic, cultural, and legal climate surrounding them - equally compelling. The Warmth of Other Suns is a well-researched work that blends oral and academic history in a thoroughly accessible manner.As I said earlier, The Warmth of Other Suns does not tell my story - but it tells a story I really didn't know, and one that I think I needed to know. It's a story that I suspect most Americans don't know nearly enough about - and we need to know it. The story is an essential piece of contemporary history, and one that we need to understand better. As told in this book, it's eye-opening, enlightening, frightening, inspiring, and provocative in the best way. Please don't be intimidated by that 600-plus page count - it moves quickly, and it's hard not to get swept up in it. This is a must-read.
  • (5/5)
    Isabel Wilkerson sure did her research. She's combined 3 almost novellas as she describes the established routes African Americans used to escape the Jim Crow South into the North and West. There's the lovely, undereducated Ida Mae Brandon Gladney who takes the train from poverty in Mississippi and goes with her family to Chicago. There's not educated quite enough but union organizer at heart George Swanson Starling who escapes almost certain death in Florida to ride the train to New York; and there's the way too proud for his own good, professional man Dr. Robert Joseph Pershing Foster who drove from Louisiana to a very big life in Los Angeles. Your heart goes out to the people she profiles as she discusses their lives in relation to the history of the time. I even ended up with feelings for Dr. Foster who could be a very difficult and controlling person. Isabel Wilkerson discusses the fact that these people were escaping Jim Crow country, but that they began and ended as Americans. They were non-immigrant immigrants who acted like the other immigrants we've read about. They continued to treasure the foods of their home towns, maintained societies celebrating their home towns, sent money home, sometimes maintained the accents of their youth for life, encouraged those left behind to join the migration, valued family and education and worked very hard. Evidently at some point people tried to say blacks left the South for elsewhere chasing better welfare payments, but that they were in reality less likely to be on welfare than people born in their new communities. Throughout her book, Wilkerson quotes from the published work of famous migrants. This is one of my favorites to explain why so many people would leave the land of their birth:The lazy, laughing SouthWith blood on its mouth...Passionate, cruel, Honey-lipped,syphilitic--That is the South.And I, who amblack, would love herBut she spits in my face...So now I seek the North--The cold-faced North,For she, they say,is a kinder mistress. Langston Hughes, "The South"The migration changed both the ones who left and the South itself, leading, eventually to the demise of Jim Crow. But it was a long time in coming.
  • (4/5)
    A little long, a little repetitive, but a story that needed to be told by those who actually experienced the Great Migration. Wilkerson writes very well, and captures the drama of the movement by African-Americans from Louisiana, Florida, and Mississippi to Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago. Not exactly a page-turner, but I learned a lot, and it wasn't just dry narrative.
  • (5/5)
    4817. The Warmth of Other Suns The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, by Isabel Wilkerson (read 19 Apr 2011) (National Book Critics Circle Nonfiction award in 2011) This book tells the story of three people from the South who left for New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. It is inimate biography of each of the three, all dead by now. I found it utterly absorbing reading, throwing much light not only on life for blacks in the Jim Crow South but also on the life they came to in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. This if a must read for anyone interested in the tremendously important subject of the migration from the South by Negroes seeking a better life. It was much better than I expected it would be, since I only read it because of the prize it won. I am mighty glad it won, else I might not have read it.
  • (4/5)
    Powerful writing and stories. I loved how she was very visible in this story as a listener.