• audiobook

From the Publisher

People fear public speaking more than any other situation. The reluctance to get up in front of an audience is often a major impediment to career advancement and personal development. However, this fear can be overcome.

Caryl Rae Krannich Ph.D, author of over 40 business and personal development books, reveals the 101 secrets to become an effective speaker, including how to:

· Check the speaking environment
· Prepare a dynamite introduction
· Establish instant credibility
· Project the proper enthusiasm
· Use visuals aids effectively
· Time a speech correctly
· Close with power
· Handle questions from the audience

These techniques form the steps any person can take to move from timid to confident, from confusing to intriguing; and from filling time to commanding an audience’s attention in the quest to make an effective and memorable speech!
Published: Listen & Live Audio on
ISBN: 9781593160296
Abridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for 101 Secrets of Highly Effective Speakers
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    NPR
    2 min read
    Psychology

    Me, Myself, and IKEA: What Our Love For Swedish Furniture Says About Narcissism

    It's normal to feel drawn to people you share something with — whether that's a name, or a birthday, or a shared profession or background. But Brett Pelham finds this preference for things and people associated with us goes far beyond what we might expect. He calls this phenomenon Implicit Egotism. "There's at least a modest tendency for women named Georgia to gravitate towards Georgia, women named Virginia to gravitate towards Virginia, and the more closely the name resembles the state, the bigger the effect appears to be," Pelham says. That's not all. People who share the same birthday are s
    Entrepreneur
    2 min read
    Personal Growth

    Why Points of Difference Could Be What Brings Your Company Together

    Q: A prospective business partner is a strategic fit, and there is no evidence of impropriety or unethical behavior. However, I have heard that the new party can be difficult to work with and doesn’t operate the way my company does. Should I guide my team away from partnerships with companies and people that are not compatible with my business practices, beliefs or personality? A: When being different earns someone the label of being “difficult,” it is a good time to pause to make sure a desire for conflict-free dealings isn’t making you vulnerable to unethical behavior. Guiding your team to h
    Entrepreneur
    2 min read
    Personal Growth

    Are Severance Agreements Slimy Business?

    Q: We had to lay off an employee who wasn’t a good fit for us. I wanted to offer her a severance package of five weeks of income, to help her and her family as she searches for a new job. But I read that I should also have the employee sign a severance agreement. I know it’s common, but it feels slimy. What are the ethics here? A: Your instinct to offer severance is compassionate and appropriate. It’s also the right message to send in the marketplace: Your company treats people with respect even when things don’t work out. But the accompanying agreement isn’t slimy at all. It’s good business.