Найдите свой следующий любимый аудиокнига

Станьте участником сегодня и слушайте бесплатно в течение 30 дней
The Saturdays

The Saturdays

Написано Elizabeth Enright

Озвучено Pamela Dillman


The Saturdays

Написано Elizabeth Enright

Озвучено Pamela Dillman

оценки:
4.5/5 (67 оценки)
Длина:
4 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1969
ISBN:
9781593162993
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге

Описание

Meet the Melendys!

Mona, the eldest, is thirteen. She has decided to become an actress and can recite poetry at the drop of a hat. Rush is twelve and a bit mischievous. Miranda is ten and a half. She loves dancing and painting pictures. Oliver is the youngest. At six, he is a calm and thoughtful person. They all live with their father, who is a writer, and Cuffy, their beloved housekeeper, who takes on the many roles of nurse, cook, substitute mother, grandmother, and aunt.

Elizabeth Enright’s Melendy Quartet captures the lively adventures of this wonderful family as they move from the city to the country!
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1969
ISBN:
9781593162993
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге


Об авторе

Elizabeth Enright (1907-1968) was born in Oak Park, Illinois, but spent most of her life in or near New York City. Her mother was a magazine illustrator, while her father was a political cartoonist. Illustration was Enright's original career choice and she studied art in Greenwich, Connecticut; Paris, France; and New York City. After creating her first book in 1935, she developed a taste, and quickly demonstrated a talent, for writing.  Throughout her life, she won many awards, including the 1939 John Newbery Medal for Thimble Summer and a 1958 Newbery Honor for Gone-Away Lake. Among her other beloved titles are her books about the Melendy family, including The Saturdays, published in 1941. Enright also wrote short stories for adults, and her work was published in The New Yorker, The Ladies Home Journal, Cosmopolitan, The Yale Review, Harper’s, and The Saturday Evening Post. She taught creative writing at Barnard College. Translated into many languages throughout the world, Elizabeth Enright's stories are for both the young and the young at heart.

Связано с The Saturdays

Похоже на «Аудиокниги»

Обзоры

Что люди думают о The Saturdays

4.7
67 оценки / 20 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    The Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright was one of the titles mentioned in the Excellent Books for Early and Eager Readers that I reviewed not too long ago and one of the first from my holds list that I picked up to read. Firstly, even though this book was written in the 1940s it's still very readable for a contemporary middle grade (or adult in my case) audience. The book follows the 4 Melendy children (Mona, Rush, Randy, and Oliver) who are described (and drawn) with loving detail by the author along with their father, Cuffy the housekeeper, and Willy Sloper the handyman. The basic premise of the book (which is the first in a 4 part series by the way) is that the four children form a club to stave off their boredom wherein they pool their weekly allowances so that every Saturday they can each afford to go on solo adventures and do something that they really want to do (but which will likely not appeal to anyone else). Their interests much like their personalities were realistic for the time period in which the book was written although they feel somewhat far-fetched in comparison to today's children (one of the kids is obsessed with opera). Each of their Saturday adventures comes complete with peril (of the lightest variety) and life lessons learned so that there are built-in morals (sometimes heavy-handed) built into the narrative. I liked it but it's probably not going to be the first book I think of to recommend...unless the kid really digs the opera in which case I am ready. 6/10
  • (5/5)
    The Saturdays is part of a trilogy set The Melendy Family , that I borrowed from the library over and over as a kid. Somehow, I was recently spurred to re-read these stories (which actually has a fourth one published later on) but an used copy of the red-covered trilogy is way out of my budget. So, I'm settling for these paperbacks with awful cover illustrations -- but at least they include the 1940s-era interior illustrations.This first book about the Melendy Family has them living in New York City and it was fun how my memories would return as I read their escapades on how Mona, Rush (who I crushed on back as a girl),Randy, and Oliver agree to pool their allowance money so that each can take turns splurging on what each wants to do on their Saturdays.Fun trip down memory lane.
  • (5/5)
    This is such a cute book! Four siblings are bored, bored, bored on a Saturday. While they all receive an allowance, it's not enough for them to each do something every weekend. They decide to form the Independent Saturday Afternoon Adventure Club. Every Saturday they pool their allowances and one Melendy child gets to spend the entire day doing something adventurous of his or her choosing. Ten and half year old Randy goes to the museum to look at art and meets Mrs. Oliphant on the first Saturday. Twelve year old Rush goes to the opera and finds a dog (who he names Isaac, get it?) on the second Saturday. Mona, the only teenager in the bunch, gets her hair cut. Even young Oliver at six years old sneaks to the circus when it is his turn.
  • (5/5)
    The first and perhaps the best of a series about a family of talented, independent-minded children growing up in the 1940s. In this first book they are living in New York and by pooling their allowances they give each child a Saturday adventure. I enjoyed these stories as a child and still do; my wife who did not know them as a child read them for the first time recently and also enjoyed them.
  • (3/5)
    In the early 40s, a quartet of resourceful siblings pool their allowance money so that each Saturday, one of them can do something fun in the city. They also manage to almost burn their own house down. Twice.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:The Melendys are a family that live in a brownstone in New York City. Their family is made up of Mona, Rush, Miranda, Oliver, their father, and their housekeeper Cuffy. Cuffy is seen to the children as taking on many different roles ranging from a cook, nurse, mother, grandmother, and an aunt.Review:This book is an intermediate level reading book which addresses the family topic of single-parent households. Like many single-parent households, the children of the Melendy family have a guardian role model which is not one of their parents. Their housekeeper Cuffy has been taking care of all of there needs as we commonly see grandparents doing to children. Book is an easier read for students of this reading level.
  • (5/5)
    The Melendys consist of 4 children: Rush, Mona, Randy and Oliver, one housekeeper, Cuffy, and one largely busy with his own life Dad. The mother is dead. Action takes pace in 1941 in a brownstone on 57th St. in Manhattan.


    The chldren, aged 13, 12, 10 and 6, receive an allowance every week. They decide to pool their resources on rainy saturdays so that each child gets a chance to use the whole amount on whatever she likes. With permission from the father, the children may leave the house on their own so long as they return by 5:30 for supper.

    Saturday 1 Randy goes to an art gallery to look at French paintings, runs into Mrs. Oliphant, a family acquaintance, who treats her to tea and stories.

    Saturday 2 Rush goes ot the opera, and finds a dog.

    Saturday 3 Mona gets her day of beauty.

    Saturday 4 Oliver goes to the circus

    Saturday 5 there is a picnic, with gas poisoning back home

    Saturday 6 tea with Mrs. Oliphant and an invitation for the summer

    Saturday The Lighthouse for the summer. Renovations to the house.

    Just about the most charming book ever.
  • (3/5)
    In the early 40s, a quartet of resourceful siblings pool their allowance money so that each Saturday, one of them can do something fun in the city. They also manage to almost burn their own house down. Twice.
  • (4/5)
    Their personal Saturdays were very nice.
    I enjoyed Randy’s Saturday most
  • (5/5)
    The reader does an excellent job and the author a delightful way of portraying children.
  • (5/5)
    Heartwarming, exciting and funny. Lucy age 11, Lila age 9
  • (5/5)
    A good fun crazy busy awesome. Best. Book you should read it?☺?
  • (5/5)
    Mona, Rush, Randy, and Oliver Melendy live in New York City with their father and a housekeeper. The city is full of sights to see and great experiences, especially for children who dream of becoming dancers, actors, and musicians, but it’s also a bit expensive when you only get an allowance of fifty cents a week. One rainy Saturday, Randy gets the idea of pooling their resources: each Saturday, one of the four will get all of the allowances, resulting in a sum that, in the 1940s, is enough for a ticket to the opera or ballet, and various other adventures besides. Along the way, they also discover that the most enjoyable experiences are sometimes serendipitous (and free), and they make many new friends on their adventures.This was lovely! I don’t know how I missed these charming stories until now. I ran across a mention of them in comparison to The Penderwicks, which is certainly apt. I’d also recommend them to fans of E. Nesbit, Sydney Taylor’s All-of-a-Kind Family, and Noel Streatfeild. I wish I could go back and recommend them to my childhood self!
  • (5/5)
    The Saturdays is one of those books that I read over and over again when I was younger. Like Swallows and Amazons, it had a family doing adventurous things that I would never have the chance to, partly because of the accidents of location. (Believe me, I tried to make up for it–remind me to tell you how I made my sister pretend to be Nancy and Peggy Blackett with me.) Anyway, the Melendys were always an enchanting family. Despite being the oldest, and therefore having a great deal of sympathy for Mona, it was Randy I always loved the best.

    The Melendys’ story continues on from The Saturdays through Four Story Mistake, And Then There were Five, and Spiderweb for Two. But here we first make the acquaintance of Mona, Rush, Randy, and Oliver. Then there is the supporting cast: Father, Cuffy (housekeeper), Isaac (the dog), and Mrs. Elephant. I always loved the idea of the book too: the children pool their pocket money and then each have one Saturday to do something delightful.

    The Melendys aren’t cookie-cutter children, by any stretch of the imagination. They do things that turn out to be disastrous (and disastrously funny), all with the best intentions. But they are also one of the literary families whom it is a delight to know. I hope that someday I can introduce my own children to them.
  • (4/5)
    When I add books to my TBR list, I need to start noting where I heard about each book because I really wish I knew where I first learned about this one.

    My kids and I loved reading about the Melendy children and their Saturday adventures. We thoroughly enjoyed this non-preachy book about children gallivanting around Manhattan sans parents, getting into and out of scrapes, and learning self-sufficiency (and---bonus!---their adult caregivers don't get arrested or lambasted on the Internet).

    One star off because my five-year-old is now worried about coal gas and keeps talking about Hitler.
  • (5/5)
    Such a fantastic, classic, children's book. Funny that I only read it for the first time at age 31. When I was a kid, I really enjoyed and actually sought out books that took place in New York City. I found it so thrilling to read about city kids and their adventures taking the subway and walking around Central Park. This story is so sweet and funny and really, really well written.
    I can't wait to read more Elizabeth Enright.
  • (5/5)
    6/11 Re-read. I don't know if I think this book is practically perfect because I know it by heart, because I love each and every one of the characters, or because the writing is stellar. Maybe all of those things. Enright was a genius, and it makes me sad when people have never heard of her.

    This time through, the Isaac-the-dog storyline seemed somehow more touching than usual. I love Mona's sadder-but-wiser moment, and Oliver's adventure. But my favorite favorite is the story of Gabrielle and the Gypsies. But Willy Sloper on opera is classic, and close to my heart.

    Seriously, just read this book, okay?

    1/10 Re-read of an old favorite. I love it, but not as much as I love the Gone-Away books. It's somewhat dated, but not in a painful way. It's particularly odd to read about a family who lives in New York City who have a house and a yard and who are decidedly not rich.

    This book feels less like a whole book to me now and more like an introduction to the family who one comes to adore over the next two books. It's a capsule, a moment, and a series of character sketches. All of the characters are interesting but it's the barest hint of what comes next, how we come to know them in The Four Story Mistake and Then There Were Five. I will confess publicly to having no memory whatsoever of Spiderweb For Two, though I remember carrying it home from the library in my daisy-adorned bicycle basket.

    I'm impressed with the sheer staying power Enright's images have- so many things I remembered as crisply as if I'd read them for the first time last week. Who can forget Randy on the trapeze in the Office? Or Oliver at the circus? Cuffy's teeth in a glass? The vignettes are very vivid, and in a lot of ways I think this book is a love poem to a vanished New York.
  • (5/5)
    I ran into a comment about this book and remembered reading the Melendy Family Quartet many, many years ago. I was addicted to Nancy Drew mysteries and my Mother took me to the bookstore and told me I could pick out any book as long as it wasn't Nancy Drew. I remembered loving this book and, over the years, have remembered many scenes from the books. So I bought them again to see if they were as good as I remembered. They were -- admittedly they're very much of their time (1940's) but the warmth and fun is there and ageless. I'd recommend these books to any child (and, frankly, any adult looking for a little innocent fun). All of the first three books are about the same in quality -- the only one that can be skipped is Spiderweb for Two -- which suffered a little from the lack of two of the four children.
  • (5/5)
    A childhood favorite that still brings a sense of joy and peace.
  • (4/5)
    Another favorite from childhood, which Mom passed to me (I passed it back when I found my own copy).