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Remembering: A Novel (Port William)

Remembering: A Novel (Port William)

Написано Wendell Berry

Озвучено Michael Kramer


Remembering: A Novel (Port William)

Написано Wendell Berry

Озвучено Michael Kramer

оценки:
4/5 (43 оценки)
Длина:
4 часа
Издатель:
Издано:
1 июл. 2009 г.
ISBN:
9781596447806
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

It is 1976 and Andy Catlett, farmer and agricultural journalist, is walking the streets of San Francisco at dawn. In the eight months since losing his right hand to a corn-picking machine, he has also lost himself. Two thousand miles from his home in Kentucky, he begins to remember people, the land, and the comfort of knowing his place intimately. Andy's reveries evoke a membership governed by the principles of humanity and love. Inspiring and eye-opening, Remembering follows Andy's journey out of darkness and into the warm light of community.
Издатель:
Издано:
1 июл. 2009 г.
ISBN:
9781596447806
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Wendell Berry was born in Henry County, Kentucky, in 1934, and lives and farms with his wife, Tanya Berry, close to the place of his birth. A poet, critic, storyteller, and activist, he has written more than fifty books. He is the recipient of The National Humanities Medal, awarded by President Barack Obama, and was named The Jefferson Lecturer for 2012. He is a winner of the Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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  • (5/5)
    Powerful !!!!!! A day in the life of Andy Catlett.A soulful story of remembering who you are and where you came from.Redemption,integrity and dignity.A reminder we need to be true to our history and ourselves. Author, Wendell Berry is an American classic.
  • (4/5)
    ..."that an argument was losing did not mean that it should not be made."Wendell Berry's novels haunt me. Although somewhat choppy, his style has a simple eloquence. I do not necessarily agree with all of his premises or conclusions, but he does make me think. Berry's arguments do seem to be losing in our day and age, but I for one am glad that he is making them.Most of all, I am intrigued by his emphasis on place, because I was born and raised among those who valued place in a similar way. There are times when I think he puts too much stock in the concept of place as it relates to this world, since I am fully persuaded that home and place can never be fully realized in this world - the very longing for it points us to another world.But in this novel he does reveal a bit more of his "theology" of place, particularly at the end, which is reminiscent of Lewis' real Narnia within Narnia, and which even more importantly ties into the types and shadows with which this world overflows. The longing and reverence for home - for a place in this world - is strong; properly viewed and prioritized, it is an important tie which binds us to our covenant community as Christians (which has similarities what Berry calls "the membership" of the farming community in Port William).I am grateful for the boundary lines fallen in pleasant places which the Lord has graciously given in my life, with their attendant love and commitment to home, family, and community. My community now is miles removed from the community where I grew up, but it is not altogether different, and for that I am also grateful. The world Berry portrays is one which I have glimpsed in the lives of grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts, and cousins...and I realize that my children have little context for that world. I think I will ask them to read some of Berry's Port William canon to give a better idea of what has gone into the making of me, and consequently, the making of them.
  • (4/5)
    Great Read. Poetic and moving. At points the writing seemed to be a bit choppy, but enjoyable none-the-less.
  • (5/5)
    This book is lyrical and haunting. It's a bit difficult to read at first, but well worth the effort. It resonates with hope and with the awareness of an eternity that exists alongside our time-bound life.