Наслаждайтесь миллионами электронных книг, аудиокниг, журналов и других видов контента

Только $11.99 в месяц после пробной версии. Можно отменить в любое время.

Time and Again

Time and Again

Написано Jack Finney

Озвучено Campbell Scott


Time and Again

Написано Jack Finney

Озвучено Campbell Scott

оценки:
4/5 (62 оценки)
Длина:
4 часа
Издатель:
Издано:
1 мар. 1995 г.
ISBN:
9780743549264
Формат:

Описание

Finally on audio -- one of the most beloved tales of our time!

Science fiction, mystery, a passionate love story, and a detailed history of Old New York blend together in Jack Finney's spellbinding story of a young man enlisted in a secret Government experiment.

Transported from the mid-twentieth century to New York City in the year 1882, Si Morley walks the fashionable "Ladies' Mile" of Broadway, is enchanted by the jingling sleigh bells in Central Park, and solves a 20th-century mystery by discovering its 19th-century roots. Falling in love with a beautiful young woman, he ultimately finds himself forced to choose between his lives in the present and the past.

A story that will remain in the listener's memory, Time and Again is a remarkable blending of the troubled present and a nostalgic past, made vivid and extraordinarily moving by the images of a time that was...and perhaps still is.
Издатель:
Издано:
1 мар. 1995 г.
ISBN:
9780743549264
Формат:

Об авторе

Jack Finney (1911–1995) was the author of the much-loved and critically acclaimed novel Time and Again, as well as its sequel, From Time to Time. Best known for his thrillers and science fiction, a number of his books—including Invasion of the Body Snatchers—have been made into movies.


Связано с Time and Again

Похожие Аудиокниги

Похожие статьи


Обзоры

Что люди думают о Time and Again

4.1
62 оценки / 79 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Fantastic ending. Starts out a bit slow and picks up steam throughout. The leap of imagination for time travel is rather reasonable. Very enjoyable read.
  • (5/5)
    There's something about this book that makes it possible to believe in time travel, and that alone makes it something far beyond time travel books I've read in the past. Finney manages to build this world and the premise so carefully, and the logic is so wonderfully simple and sensible in its own way, that his utterly real characters make it seem as if we're not reading about some other world, but our own reality where, just perhaps, this might be possible. That's the beauty of this book, combined with his wonderful characters and writing that sucks you in and all but demands that you keep turning pages. Each time I sat down to read a few chapters, I read far more than that, and had to be forced by time or my eyes to finally put the book down.I freely admit that I'm not much for time travel books, normally, though I love fantasy--this brings together everything I love about suspense, literary fiction, fantasy, and speculative fiction in general, into a tale that feels more real and translated into fiction than it feels like a story.I'd absolutely recommend, and I'm so glad to have discovered this author.
  • (4/5)
    Thanks to insomnia and a slow shift at work, I read all of Jack Finney's remarkable book Time and Again, which was written in 1970. Both historical fiction and science fiction, the focus of the novel is time travel through a process of intense learning about a period in the past combined with the practice of self-hypnosis. And it works! Artist Simon Morley is the first to jump to the past successfully, from 1970 New York City to the same city in 1882. Despite his careful preparation for the journey backwards, Simon is overwhelmed, not surprisingly, by the reality of being in New York in 1882. Everything is the same, but different. Trinity Church is the tallest building in the city. The Statue of Liberty does not yet grace the harbour. Food tastes better, houses are colder, fire is lethal as almost everything in the city is made of wood. Fire plays a large and terrifying role in the book. Like any good story, there is a romance - or two, in this case, one in the present and one in the past. There are schemes of blackmail, murder, sledding in Central Park on a snowy day, and the joys and struggles of a sudden transition to a different era, a different century. I liked the book and thought that Finney's story had interesting ideas, and certainly it is a good book. May I say that it was, possibly, too masculine for my taste? There was a flavour of a Boys' Own periodical in it that I never could get past, where women are in the script because they have to be, not because they're welcome. Finney is obviously no woman-hater: the women he designs for Morley are capable, intelligent, beautiful, and feisty, but there is a masculinity to them as well. Still, it was a good and creative book, and I enjoyed reading it.
  • (3/5)
    The plot was pretty predictable. Great descriptive of NYC in 1882 though.
  • (4/5)
    The first half of this book went slowly, with all the problems I have learned to expect in science fiction of that era. It got better, and I enjoyed the second half.
  • (5/5)
    A mystery which is solved by time travel. The illustrations are wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    A timeless classic that is perhaps more relevant now than when it was written.
  • (4/5)
    Read this a while ago, and on re-read I had remembered the central premise and the romance angle, but none of the plot cladding and not the curl in the end of the tale either. Well-constructed and solid, but just a bit too much going on; I lost track a bit as to who was what and doing which bit.I have no quibbles with the time-travel mechanism (while noting that there's a reason this is in the Fantasy masterworks series rather than the SF one) but I do disagree with the underlying theme of the past as a golden time, better than the present. The narrator does point out the social and health improvements between the 1880s and the 1960s but he still is enchanted by an indefinable something in the faces of the people in the past, in a way that I find unbelievable.
  • (3/5)
    I can see potential in this time travel novel, but the scenes in it dragged on for far too long. I enjoyed the character relationships the most.
  • (3/5)
    An interesting idea and a good mystery to solve, but in the end Finney's journey back into the past is overwrought with descriptions of late nineteenth-century New York City. I found myself skimming several paragraphs in a row describing the city but not in relation to any plot points. It seems like so much attention was paid to describing the city that motivation and character details were overlooked.
  • (4/5)
    Such a great story, and original. I thought that maybe it took a little long to get going, what with the set-up, the explanation, the preparation, etc, but then the journey, and the complications, and the mystery of traveling in time- that was all brilliant. I could sort of sense where the plot would go, but not all of it, and enjoyed reading along anyway. What I liked best were the detailed glimpses of 1882- my favorite era!- even down to watercolors and photographs, which gave me a thrill to see. Also, the 1st-person-voice allowed for those marvelous scenes of intense feeling when he saw and understood people from another time to be REAL...Highly Recommended for adventure and excitement!
  • (4/5)
    Six-word review: Imagination takes flight across the decades.Extended review:Recruited as a subject for an extremely secret government project, commercial artist Simon Morley bridges the interval from the New York City of 1970 to the same city as it was in 1882. How his life and those of others change as a result is the plot of the novel, which blends mystery and romance with the ever-intriguing theme of time travel. There's a nice twist at the end.The author isn't shy about revealing his fascination with the everyday sights and events of New York in the late nineteenth century; in fact, at times it seems as if his whole purpose were to show off the extent of his research. He has an ability to bring the period and place to life, as if he himself had seen it first hand, making us feel as though we were seeing it too. Finney's use of contemporary illustrative art, photographs, and newspaper stories lends authenticity to his very evocative rendition of time and place. If at times it does seem to grow long, I think perhaps that's only a matter of my own twenty-first-century impatience, cultivated by an environment in which a five-second computer response time is referred to as "forever."One of the most interesting aspects of this story, however, is almost certainly outside the author's design: namely, his depiction of a major U.S. city in the late middle of the twentieth century. In 1970, Richard Nixon was president; the Cuban missile crisis and the Kennedy assassination were events in recent memory; the Civil Rights movement was in progress, although (to judge from the author's use of language: young women are all "girls") women's liberation had a long way to go in raising public consciousness; pollution was already a major issue, but computers were still a novelty, and small electronic devices were science fiction. In contrasting 1882 with 1970, Finney shows us a period 46 years ago that seems calmer and safer than 2016, even though in so many ways it already felt dark and dangerous at the time.This is not a heavy or especially serious book, although it has its moments (and there are a few little questions of logic and continuity). It's mostly just an entertaining fantasy, with an extra dose of verisimilitude to make us feel as if we'd been there. And that we might want to go again.
  • (5/5)
    This book is often categorized as "science fiction," a baffling choice as the author himself is somewhat at war with the idea of technological advancement. Science fantasy, maybe, and overly nostalgic for sure.However, if you can accept Finney's novel as a product of its time, all becomes clear. Finney is writing and living in a world somewhat convinced that humanity is bound to destroy itself any day now. Fear of communism, fresh off the Bay of Pigs Incedent, it is no wonder that Finney, and therefore the book's main character, Si Morely, long for the "simple times" of days gone by.Sentimentalism aside, Time and Again is just a beautifully constructed book, and a perennial favorite. Some may find the story plodding, too detailed, but I love it. The sheer volume of description takes one, like the time traveler Morely, right back into the 1880s. Obviously, Finney's research was exhaustive. The descriptions... well, defy description. I can't say I knew much about NYC, much less in the late 1800s, but I do now. Finney really makes it live and breathe.But this isn't just a time-travel novel, oh no! This is a romance-mystery-adventure. Like all great books, Time and Again really defies genre, instead getting you involved in the lives, trials, and tribulations of the people that inhabit it.Again, though,it is a novel of its time, and even the most unobservant reader is bound to notice the glaring sexism as secretaries are leered at, commented on, and never called anything, anything, but "girl." A mock butt-slapping incident twigged me for days. Thankfully, most of the novel is set in 1882 where, oddly, Si's sexism more or less disappears. Really just a great journey through the past. So, like Si, hop on board an old horse-drawn bus, sit back, and just enjoy the scenery.
  • (5/5)
    This book was such a trip - no pun intended. I really enjoyed it on two levels; I found the story interesting. Time travel books are among my favorites even though this is a bit different from the usual. The second level of enjoyment came from reading a book written in 1970. It was like another layer of time travel albeit one not intended by the author. This is a book that takes place in a world of locks and keys, dial up telephones and typewriters. I suspect for a generation who did not grow up in that world it must seem very alien. For me it was like a touch of nostalgia and I suspect it added to my enjoyment.Si Morely is an artist who is working for an ad agency (where he draws with a pencil!). He's approached by a man to join a government program but he can't know what it is until he knows if he qualifies. It's all very mysterious but Si is bored at his job and he really has no connections so he figures, what the heck. Si passes the test and he learns that the program is about time travel.Si has a girlfriend who's adopted father had a sad history part of which included a letter mailed in New York in 1882 so using the "method" Si wants to go back to that period to watch the letter being mailed. Of course he is not allowed to change history. As Si learns what he needs to know things are not all as up and up as they seem and he needs to figure out whom he can trust and he has to figure out where he belongs.I truly enjoyed this story. It held my interest 'til the end. It was so very different from books written today and I don't even know if I can tell you why. It really was like stepping back into another world. I'm keeping it to read again because I suspect I'll find something on a second read through that I missed on the first. The characters are well developed and diverse and the plot is full of fun little twists and turns. The addition of the old photos and drawings only adds to the fun of the book.
  • (4/5)
    Si, the main character here, is recruited by a government agency to participate in a time travel project. Thus, he travels back to New York City in 1882. He falls in love with someone, also. Much of this novel focuses on that place and era in detail (with illustrations/photos throughout); so those without an interest in old NYC may not find this as engaging as I did.
  • (5/5)
    If you wondered what would happen if you went back in time, this is a a great place to start!
    If takes you back to a world without airplanes, computers, cell phones or televisions!
    It has a fascinating plot about returning to a simpler time and coming back home to modern times at will.
    Very interesting with many plot turns and twists, I highly recommend it.
    I even inspired Stephen King to wring his huge time travel opus 11/22/63.

  • (4/5)
    A very interesting read. I highly recommend it.The author transplants you back to early NYC.
  • (4/5)
    Since my teens, I've rarely delved into science fiction. Other than Kurt Vonnegut's novels and short stories, most of the S-F I've read hasn't appealed to me very much. I know that that's not a fair judgment of the entire genre. Surely there's a lot of good stuff out there. I just haven't found it. So when I read in Stephen King's afterword to his 11-22-63 that he considered Jack Finney's TIME AND AGAIN to be the best time travel he'd ever read, I put it on my list.And I'm glad I did. Finney does a masterful job of putting the reader back in the year 1882 in the bustling metropolis of New York City. It's a great read.
  • (4/5)
    This was a really fun read, deserving of it's status as a classic. While clearly a product of its time with sexism and dated references, there was still something quite fun reading a novel about time travel contrasting the 1970s with the 1880s, from my pov in 2015. My husband laughe out loud when I read him the description of the miraculous tv you could turn on using KNOBS! And it had SIX channels! . The end was a nice twist too.
  • (2/5)
    My goodness. I'm glad that's over. Not that this is a bad book ... or badly written. It is neither. Maybe it just wasn't my cup of tea. First of all, I am a very literal thinker, and to suspend belief that self-hypnosis will actually and literally place you in the past was something I could never quite attain. If I am reading about vampires, I know that they don't exist, so there is really no suspension of belief needed. There was never any belief to begin with. With this one, though ...

    Si is a likable character, as is Julia. Rube and Dr. Danziger are likable enough on the periphery. Kate played a big role in the beginning and then just disappeared. I never felt any compassion or affinity for any of the characters. I was never invested in whether or not the project continued, whether or not Julia married Jake, or whether or not Si ever accomplished his goals. The twist at the end left me neither hot nor cold.

    I can't say that I don't recommend the book, but there are so many other books out there with time travel which I found to be more engaging. I would recommend those, instead. I will not be reading any further in this series.
  • (2/5)
    A strange cross between a secret-govt.-project time-travel sci-fi novel, a period mystery and a 19th-century NYC nostalgia-fest.
    Liberally illustrated with period drawings and photographs that purport to be by the main character (although they obviously aren't) - but it's an original and interesting aspect.
    This novel is notable for being by the guy who wrote Invasion of the Body Snatchers.
    As is the case with most time-travel stories, the logic of the time-travel concept doesn't really hold up - you need a good suspension of disbelief - but the main focus of the book is a joy and appreciation for the details of New York City life in the 1880's - and the mystery and the romance do hold up their end as far as interest...
    I don't know if I'd call it a 'masterwork', but it was interesting to read...
  • (4/5)
    There's something magical in the writing style of this book. Something that makes there seem (to me) to be less plot, less drama - but makes the subtlety, the emphasis on place & time, to be more than enough to make up for the lack of excitement. I don't know exactly how I feel about this book - it's not SF but I can't seem to view it clearly through a lens of literature either - all I really have is a fuzzy sense of goodwill towards it. And this is the second time I've read it. Maybe I'll get more as I discuss it with fellow fans of Time Travel in our Group Read, this June 2014.
  • (4/5)
    Double the time travel for your money: New York in 1882 & 1970. Finney is weirdly and pleasingly meticulous about describing how people eat their sandwiches, move chairs around, play practical jokes. It brings the quotidian to humdrum life in the modern-day scenes and highlights the fantastical in 19th century life. Plot twists & turns are by far the least interesting part.
  • (2/5)
    As a fan of time travel stories I found this to be very disappointing. The time travel theme is just an excuse to present a detailed description of New York in the 1880s. If I was looking for that I would have consulted a history book. The basic idea is good but it is totally wasted. it's a pity that it was not written by a scifi author who really knows the genre.
  • (1/5)
    Could not bring myself to read this boring boring book. I love time travel stories, but there is so much leading up to any sort of action that I couldn't tell you how the "action" is because I never got that far. I started skimming pages and pages an still nothing. Bah!
  • (3/5)
    Starts well, but fails in the end.
  • (4/5)
    Probably more like a 3.5. But this was a great read. Learned of the book on recommendation from Stephen King afterword of his time travel book on JFK. In this book the "present" is 1970, the "past" the 1880s. The distance between now and 1970 is as much the power of reading this book as the original context. A great read. I still would probably give the nod to "Map of Time" for my favorite time travel book of the year. But this was fun. Got a bit overwrought in some passages. But overall a great read. With a fine twist at the end, which is always required for this sort of book.
  • (5/5)
    This book is often categorized as "science fiction," a baffling choice as the author himself is somewhat at war with the idea of technological advancement. Science fantasy, maybe, and overly nostalgic for sure.However, if you can accept Finney's novel as a product of its time, all becomes clear. Finney is writing and living in a world somewhat convinced that humanity is bound to destroy itself any day now. Fear of communism, fresh off the Bay of Pigs Incedent, it is no wonder that Finney, and therefore the book's main character, Si Morely, long for the "simple times" of days gone by.Sentimentalism aside, Time and Again is just a beautifully constructed book, and a perennial favorite. Some may find the story plodding, too detailed, but I love it. The sheer volume of description takes one, like the time traveler Morely, right back into the 1880s. Obviously, Finney's research was exhaustive. The descriptions... well, defy description. I can't say I knew much about NYC, much less in the late 1800s, but I do now. Finney really makes it live and breathe.But this isn't just a time-travel novel, oh no! This is a romance-mystery-adventure. Like all great books, Time and Again really defies genre, instead getting you involved in the lives, trials, and tribulations of the people that inhabit it.Again, though,it is a novel of its time, and even the most unobservant reader is bound to notice the glaring sexism as secretaries are leered at, commented on, and never called anything, anything, but "girl." A mock butt-slapping incident twigged me for days. Thankfully, most of the novel is set in 1882 where, oddly, Si's sexism more or less disappears. Really just a great journey through the past. So, like Si, hop on board an old horse-drawn bus, sit back, and just enjoy the scenery.
  • (4/5)
    This story was published in 1970 and feels about that old in writing style. This could almost have been written yesterday however. Finney is famous for writing this novel as well as the earlier "Invasion of the Body Snatchers". This is nominally a science fiction novel. The old fashioned term "scientific romance" works better for me. There's a time travel trick in here. A trick kinda like the film "Somewhere In Time". Otherwise this is more of an historical fiction piece of New York in 1882 as well as a bit of the author's present of 1969-1970. So if you want a feel for New York, here it is. In fact this is a bit of a love affair with 1882 New York, all pretty at first and then the reality smacks you hard.I had a little trouble buying into the premise, and the story I thought rather slow at first, but once the story got going I was caught up in it. By the time I was about a quarter way through I realized I was really enjoying it and it just got better. Something of a mystery and romance. Some nice twists and turns. There are also a number of illustrations which I thought added greatly to the adventure in time. Towards the end the story became very exciting and a real page-turner.There is a sequel to this which I will read very soon.Recommended
  • (4/5)
    Time-travel sci-fi? Historical fiction (New York City in the 1880's)? Love story? Mystery?

    It's all here. A real favorite.