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What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast: A Short Guide to Making Over Your Mornings—and Life

What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast: A Short Guide to Making Over Your Mornings—and Life

Написано Laura Vanderkam

Озвучено Laura Vanderkam


What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast: A Short Guide to Making Over Your Mornings—and Life

Написано Laura Vanderkam

Озвучено Laura Vanderkam

оценки:
4/5 (33 оценки)
Длина:
5 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jul 9, 2012
ISBN:
9781469026688
Формат:

Описание

Laura Vanderkam has combined her three popular audiobooks into one comprehensive guide, with a new introduction. It will help listeners build habits that lead to happier, more productive lives, despite the pressures of their busy schedules. Through interviews and anecdotes, she reveals...
  • What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast - to jump-start the day productively.
  • What the Most Successful People Do on the Weekend - to recharge and prepare for a great week.
  • What the Most Successful People Do at Work - to accomplish more in less time.
Издатель:
Издано:
Jul 9, 2012
ISBN:
9781469026688
Формат:


Об авторе

Laura Vanderkam is a contributing editor at Reader's Digest and is the coauthor of Genius Denied: How to Stop Wasting Our Brightest Young Minds. She lives with her husband in New York City.

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Что люди думают о What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast

4.1
33 оценки / 9 Обзоры
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  • (1/5)
    (Original review, 2013)This is all grimly self-helpish and there is no common denominator, so there is no top tips take-away. I’m coming from the Rough Guide’s “50 things You Must Do Before You Die” and all that, this is a bit of a double whammy. Are we supposed to squeeze the last drop of productivity out of every second? I spotted a book with the title “What The Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast” and I just had to buy to see for myself what it was all about. (Make it, presumably - or if they're really successful, have the help make it.) There is no end to it. Can't we just get our Weetabix down us in peace?A lot of the examples are solitaries who live in their own imaginative world, so can defy the dictates of daily routine more. The old drugs help creativity thing does need to be laid to rest. Although, each probably had some mild stimulant - I believe Erdös said something like: 'A mathematician is a machine for turning caffeine into formulae.' But most of humanity's rhythms are dictated by an employer who sticks them on shifts that will trash their body clock. They won't recognize the delightfully eccentric world portrayed here. Some imaginative souls, though, obviously, welcomed the routine. Wallace Stevens was a life-long insurance salesman and was no doubt coming up with some pretty bizarre imagery and original language while poring over policies, as an antidote to the mundanity of it all. Maybe he and Eliot deliberately went against the romantic cliché of the poet for their own sanity.I don't know if anyone else feels this, but I have always felt that the basic unit of physiological time - the day - is just too short for me. It's just too itty-bitty and doesn't suit my rhythms but I can't see it being changed under edict of the EU. Maybe if it was a normal-two-days long day, then you could get into stuff more, but it seems before you know it, you're getting undressed and into bed again and then staring at that damned toothbrush again next morning in a very Groundhog Day kind of way. Routine is essential to humans but it is dreadfully double-edged.And you can imagine a Kafka being driven barmy by noise - he probably was glad of the 'horror' of the office. There may have been some relative serenity there. How can anyone study toward and work at any profession in a working-class area, or anywhere which tends to be unholy bedlam. You need this precious commodity of reasonable quiet more than anything. Without it - if the mind cannot be quietened and focused - what of any seriousness can be achieved? More a class handicap than many others.So for best results, I should get ready to down coffee (which I don’t drink) and a martini, then fix up, and sniff rotten apples, all in the nude. But where do I get this Bergman Ready-Brek?
  • (3/5)
    I feel inspired! I hope, no, gonna make sure, that I feel like that tomorrow morning as well. Time for change...! (Hope, hope).It was inspiring with the little notices on how high leaders arrange their mornings, and nice with tips and ideas though the fact itself is kind of, well, something you should know but maybe don't think about. Basic knowledge, but it was easy to read and to see how it could fit in to your life as well.
  • (2/5)
    For the first couple of chapters I felt like this book was certainly entertaining and slightly informative. After 40 pages or so, it became clear that it was a monotonous read that I found to be only minimally informative. Have kids? Get a babysitter! (Don't worry about being a parent...) Run a business? Hire someone to do what you don't want.

    Not the worst book I have ever read, but not one that I personally loved. In a world where blogging is so popular, I didn't feel that this book offered anything that I couldn't find on a popular self-improvement blog.
  • (3/5)
    Most of the tips were in longer books that offered more. I just feel this was no different than everything else I listened to. One thing I did enjoy is how she used mom's as examples a lot. Finally someone gets it! ?
  • (3/5)
    It was fine. The narrator's voice was really gentle so if you're looking to listen to something that will hype you up, I don't think this will do. Nonetheless, this is good for a quick mind joggle for habit creation.
  • (4/5)
    Good book to become more efficient. Wake up early and do work when you have the highest productivity. Start slow in terms of building a habit. Habits change too so adapt. Very useful and effective but hard to do. Personally, I have been doing research in the earlier hours to concentrate and it works but adding something else on top is still difficult.
  • (5/5)
    Sunday February 2nd: it’s 1105 in Chicago.

    Just completed listening to this book after I found it by referral of a friend, for the 160 Hour book.

    Delighted and inspired by the contents. For years I have been trying to convert to a morning person. This book gives me the optimism that this year I can and will become an effective morning person!
  • (2/5)
    Time track.
    Waste less time.
    Assess priorities.
    Do important things in the morning.
    Because willpower is a gas tank.

    This sure as hell did not need to be a book.
  • (3/5)
    Vanderkam has taken a few short stories about what some successful people do in the morning before breakfast and sprinkled in some of her own thoughts on why she chooses to do some of the early morning things that she does. In a nutshell, though, the books message is get up early so you can take advantage of the time to start your day off right. I don't disagree, but there are a lot of other books that talk about this in much greater detail.